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Posted By:larenzos on: 12/25/2008 12:12:51 AM


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larenzos
Posts: 4

What should I do if Customer walks out without paying?
Posted: Thursday, December 25, 2008 12:12:51 AM

Yesterday I colored a clients hair, her hair was gray and porous and the color job went wrong she ended up with hot roots. I toned her hair and it did look better, but she said it still didn't look right. I was very nice to her the entire time, I explained that I could fix the problem by toning it again and it would be a very quick fix maybe another 20 minutes of her time.  I also said if she found that she still didn't like her hair to just call me and I would gladly fix it for free.  She said she just didn't want to stay any longer and started to leave, I said excuse me but you are forgetting to pay me, she said no I don't think I'm going to pay you because I am unhappy with my hair and maybe when I get home and wash my hair and I like it I might come back and pay I don't know.  She then walked out of my shop. What should I have done, and what do I do If she calls me and wants me to fix her color.  I'm new at booth rental. My husband said I should have called the police. Help. Please



gd
Posts: 808
Gold Member

Posted: Friday, December 26, 2008 3:33:56 PM
It is hard to judge the situation without being there. But, from the perspective of the client, most people have a hard time paying for a color that didn't turn out right. It sounds like she gave you a chance to fix the color and it still wasn't right. If she calls and wants you to fix the color, I would refuse.


larenzos
Posts: 4

Posted: Saturday, December 27, 2008 1:14:33 AM
Thank you! This is good advice.  I've learned alot.  Next time I will go with my initial gut feeling when it comes to a client, because when she walked into my shop she said she'd forgotten her check book and didn't have cash.  Stupid me agreed to allow her to go to the cash machine after the service.  She may not have had any intention of paying me in the first place.  Thank you for the advice. I will make wiser decisions in the future. 

larenzos
Posts: 4

Posted: Saturday, December 27, 2008 1:14:53 AM
Thank you! This is good advice.  I've learned alot.  Next time I will go with my initial gut feeling when it comes to a client, because when she walked into my shop she said she'd forgotten her check book and didn't have cash.  Stupid me agreed to allow her to go to the cash machine after the service.  She may not have had any intention of paying me in the first place.  Thank you for the advice. I will make wiser decisions in the future. 


larenzos
Posts: 4

Posted: Saturday, December 27, 2008 1:15:23 AM
Thank you! This is good advice.  I've learned alot.  Next time I will go with my initial gut feeling when it comes to a client, because when she walked into my shop she said she'd forgotten her check book and didn't have cash.  Stupid me agreed to allow her to go to the cash machine after the service.  She may not have had any intention of paying me in the first place.  Thank you for the advice. I will make wiser decisions in the future. 

russnyc
Posts: 1142
Platinum Member

Can't enforce it
Posted: Saturday, December 27, 2008 7:42:21 AM
First of all, bad haircolor is a LOT like bad food in the service industry. You might insist on getting her money, but she can go right to CitySearch and RUIN any chance of you getting any OTHER new clients by making a nasty comment online.

Stop looking at the money you may have lost in this transaction, and look at the experience you GAINED.

The days of 4 hour color corrections are OVER. NO ONE has four hours to spend in a salon. Nail it the VERY FIRST TIME.

Go over your formulation again. When dealing with a brand new client at a level 5, you should automatically be putting in ash to counteract red if you are using 20v.

Irish and Scottish people, or people with creamy/ruddy complexions will pull plenty of red orange and gold.

Try to place the complexion with a client you already do. Make sure there is PLENTY of N series mixed in to cover "chunky" grey.

I also ask questions such as if the color has turned out too warm before, and AVOID burgundy or violet right at the root if it's a fashion shade. Apply a boring and predicable formula on a first time client until you see how her hair reacts.

Use an all over GLOSS afterwards if you want to add a fashion shade.

Remember, a brand new client is expecting to be treated THE SAME from the salon she left even though you don't know her, which means the processing and application times should be the SAME.

If it looks like she's going to need more time, tell her well before the appointment, so she can shoehorn it into her schedule...

I had a client compliment me because I can get her in and out in an hour, it was taking 4 HOURS at her last place!

Quite simply, it's a service, not a dress. If she doesn't like it, she doesn't pay. You CAN enforce payment, but she's SURE TO TELL EVERYONE SHE KNOWS THAT YOU DID.
Russ H.
Colorist at the Roy Teeluck Salon
57th & Madison Avenue, Manhattan NYC

"There are no ugly women, only lazy ones."
-Helena Rubenstein