Discussion Board:
Bulletin Boards > A day in the life of.... > difficult working conditions
Posted By:
Posted By:julieann on: 4/10/2009 9:48:52 PM


Display:
Author: Thread: difficult working conditions
julieann
Posts: 34

difficult working conditions
Posted: Friday, April 10, 2009 9:48:52 PM
Is there anyone else out there who has to deal on a regular basis with a pathological liar? I would just be interested in understanding this personality disorder better in hopes that it will help me cope with it. I could go on forever about the stories and you all would die laughing but in all honesty it gets exhausting. Any insight out there?

da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2009 9:59:14 AM
in my opinion, i don't think being a pathological liar is a personality disorder. i think it is just someone who likes to stir up drama and rile everyone up. I wouldn't pay any attention to them.

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 6:10:20 AM
Ok, thanks for posting a reply. I guess it should be easier to ignore but for some reason it upsets me more than it should. It's our boss and owner who does this so it's hard to get away from. It definitely does work to stir up drama.

da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 8:56:18 AM
It your boss and owner?! I'm floored that they would conduct themselves like that. I would probably consider looking for another job.

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 12:07:42 PM
It sure is. He has more of a reputation in the community for lying than he does for doing hair. He regularly tells me that he ran into this client or that client of mine and they want to move into his chair but they just don't know how to go about doing it. (I checked on this and it was a complete lie). He tells people he meets that he's the only one that works there as a stylist (there are three of us, all stylists). He makes up stories about celebrity hair he's done, property he owns, and people he knows (Madonna). I've thought seriously about moving but I've never moved before so it scares me. I'm also afraid of the many stories he will make up about me if I left. I know I'm being a baby about it, I guess I just need to vent somewhere safe. Thanks for listening.

pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

who needs it?
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 3:50:47 PM
why put up with a drama queen who needs to make things up to boost his ego? i would go sooner rather than later, because it'll only get worse.if it was a bigger salon, where you could avoid him, i'd say just laugh it off, but since it is close quarters, and he's in charge,there's no way to keep out of his sights.you will move around in your career until you find the place that is right for you, this seems like a toxic environment to me.

mslynn
Posts: 58

working conditions
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 4:26:15 PM
my advice to you is plan on making immediate moving arrangements. this is not to say you will find a place the next time that may be worse than before. i have been in the business 24 years. i have had to move many times, scared every one of them. during this ordeal i ended up on blood pressure medication and anxiety medication. finally it did work out for me. just remember, you can't change people, just remove yourself from the situation. good luck!!!!!! hang in there.


julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Monday, April 20, 2009 8:48:14 PM
Thank you all so much for the supportive advice. I've never been permitted to promote myself with business cards, promotions, ads (even ones I wanted to pay for) or anything other than referrals from my own clients. I talked to a girl I know who does booth rental and she's allowed to promote herself any way she wants! She has her own business cards and can put an ad in the paper if she wants to. Now I know that I'm not wrong in thinking I need to move. It's so true that you can't change people. I really needed to hear someone else say it- thank you.

pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

to follow up on that
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 8:41:15 PM
you know, you don't need to rent a chair to promote yourself. any professional salon owner would do all of that for you. i hope you find a more nurturing place to work.good luck to you.

julieann
Posts: 34

the latest-help me!
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:36:04 PM
Just thought I'd share a new development with you stylists that responded to this post. I found out yesterday from a fellow stylist that my boss and owner has been cutting some of my clients when I'm not there. Now I totally understand people deciding to switch chairs, some have moved over to mine. However in this case he cut one of my guys for half price. Then he cut one of my girls free. He offered this to them and since they're in a tough economic situation they accepted. Please tell me what you think of this. He did not put the names on our book, so I'm guessing he didn't want me to find out. One more question for you: How much money do you think a stylist should be bringing in to be able to rent a chair for $100 a week? I've been offered a booth rent job but I don't know if I can do it. Thank you soooo much!

da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

It's time to go!
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 10:16:53 PM
This is a very unprofessional place to be. A boss should NEVER go behind your back and do your clients for half off or free. I understand if you weren't there and a client needed a service that day. But to deliberately do that is horrendous. Take my advice and go to another place.

As with moving to booth rent, you are what you make. People will always want to look good whether it is a recession or not. If you are able to better promote yourself, you could probably bring in more clients and stay booked up. Keep positive...it will help you in the long run. :-D

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Thursday, April 23, 2009 6:01:33 AM
Thank you. I'll let you know what happens

Heidi59
Posts: 2

get out
Posted: Sunday, April 26, 2009 1:28:12 PM

I agree with all the postings. This is not a place for you to be. If the entire salon has not already gotten the reputation of lacking integrity because of the owner it will sooner or later. This could seriously damage your career. $100 per week is a pretty good rent, I pay almost twice that much. You will have to do some numbers crunching on what you brig in now and whatyou estimate your expenses to be including taxes to determinne if itwould be viable for you to rent.

Please consider getting all the contact info you can on every client you do and this includes any walk ins. Another thing you must consider before booth renting is your business savvy because you will be in charge of everything yourself. Please do your homework. I wish you well.



julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Sunday, April 26, 2009 2:57:15 PM
Ok everybody, I went in today and collected all my records. I got all the names and numbers of everyone I've done in the past 2 years. I brought home my color file box and I'm going to copy down all my formulas. I have a loyal but small groups of clients that I believe will follow me. I'm pretty sure about the booth renting thing. A salon owner down the road has offered me six weeks free rent to get started. I think that's going to help a lot. So now I need to get my IC license and start collecting everything! Color, backboard, foil, developer, wax, gloves....it's overwhelming. Once I get everything purchased I need to think about how to let everyone know. Should I call them, send them a card or both? Should I put an ad in the local newspaper to let everyone know I've moved? If so what should the ad say? I want to be classy about this and not put down the salon I'm leaving so any suggestions would help a lot. Thank you all again so much. You've been a real motivation and encouragement.

da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

awesome!
Posted: Sunday, April 26, 2009 9:25:12 PM
i'm glad to hear you found something new! on getting new clients & keeping regulars, i'd send out postcards and tell them that if they refer people, they'll get an incentive. you know people always love that! good luck w/ everything! :-D

BTC TEAM MEMBER Sarah K
Posts: 19

Booth Rentail Checklist
Posted: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 11:45:56 AM

Dear Friends,


You have all provided fantastic feedback to JulieAnn.  This is indeed a difficult working situationt to be faced with.  When you go to work each day you want to make sure you are doing so with a feel good attitude and do not want to dread going there.  I understand, I have been there!


In Regards to how much money you need to make to pay the rent, there are a few different suggestions I can make for you.  Because I do not know how much you charge for services, I am going to give you an average, but please input your information as necessary.


Clients per day = 5  Client Total= $25


4 day workweek = $500


If you averaged 5 people per day at $25, you would end up with $500 at the end of the week.  That would cover your weekly rent of $100.  Another thing to think about is how much you spend per day in product usage (Wet line or styling line and color if applicable)  Also, do you sell Retail?  As a booth renter, that is key to thinking about paying your rent.  If you average making $6 per product you sell you need to average 16 products per month to pay for your rent.  Than everything that you make doing hair, you take with you!


Just another reason how Retail can pay your rent!


Thank you!

Sarah                                                                 BTC Bulletin Board Moderator sarahk@behindthechair.com



julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 8:34:19 PM
Thanks for that. I've started crunching numbers and I can tell that I'll be hurting for a while because of start up costs. I'm trying to keep it simple. You're right about the retail. I called a company today that is going to help me out with samples so I can see what my clients like and what they are willing to buy. Any other ideas out there I'd love to hear them.

heatherdazy
Posts: 320
Silver Member

Posted: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 9:16:11 PM
Congrats on moving! $100 a week is an amazing deal for you. I pay $750/month.

I was also rushed into renting by a bad work situation. All I can say is promote yourself as much as possible.

Remember to hand out your business cards to everyone, offer discounts for referrals, etc.

Get your own phone line or separate cell phone line so all of your clients speak to you directly.

Also, I kept my existing clients at their old prices to make their transition easier, but otherwise I raised my prices about 20% (the new atmosphere is a big upgrade)

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 6:06:01 AM
I'm happy to hear you made it and you're doing well. Thanks for the advice. I was thinking about lowering my prices to attract people but I guess I won't do that.

Humberto
Posts: 271
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 7:30:38 PM
Don't forget taxes, product costs, consumables, etc. Don't get discouraged, just learn to give every client great service quickly. Always work fast, even if you have only one client for the day.

One of the biggest mistakes stylists make is to equate great service with spending longer time on the client.

You are selling your experience, skill and TIME.
As you become more successful "time" will be the most valuable. Treat it that way from the beginning. Don't waste your or the clients time by taking 1 hour on a cut that could have been finished in 20 minutes or a 3 hour hilite that could have been finished in 1 hour.

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 7:39:56 PM
Ouch, I'm definitely guilty of that. I probably do have some of my clients spoiled with how much time I spend with them. Speaking of taxes; when you booth rent do you pay taxes quarterly? If so how do you know how much to pay in. I'm also spending a lot right now getting everything. I've kept all my receipts but do I only get to write that off when I file next year? I apologize if this isn't the right thread to post this question but you all have helped me so much!

heatherdazy
Posts: 320
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 8:13:38 PM
I wouldn't lower prices unless your current ones are truly outrageous... your existing clients will feel like they've been overpaying in the past. Better to have higher prices that give you a little wiggle room to offer discounts...

At one point I offered college students 2-for-1 color when they came in at the same time as a friend. I was able to double book them (something I normally don't do) and the time saved paid for some of the special. They felt like they were getting a great deal rather than a cheap service.

You could also offer a discount every time someone sends in a referral, sell discounted gift certificates for a limited time, or give a percentage off to clients who prebook and then actually keep that appt.

If you have low prices, it can make it harder to promote yourself because you won't be able to offer specials like that, you'll just be advertising yourself at full price.

Make your clients feel you are worth the price you're charging. Listen to them, give them scalp massages, offer them soda, send them birthday cards, keep your station spotless etc.

If you're too low, it's hard to go up. One of my coworkers used to work at a place where she charged $17 a haircut. She raised her prices to $20 and all of her clients left her! Now when she has a new client and tells them it's $35, most of them say "That's it?!" and it's only been 1 yr, so I doubt it's her cutting that has changed that much... it's all the other stuff.

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Thursday, April 30, 2009 9:36:33 PM
Very good advice. I'm seriously going to take all these suggestions and put them in action. I'm so glad to have this!

julieann
Posts: 34

now what-when to quit
Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 7:19:57 AM
Ok everybody here's where I'm at. I've bought all my supplies and sent little cards to all my clients so they know I'm moving. My first day in my new salon will be Tuesday the 12th. I've called my clients that have appointments that day and they are all gladly following me. Now the hard part-I have to tell my owner. I haven't told him before now for two reasons: 1. I still had clients on my book there and wanted to be able to do them. I know that the second I tell him he will lock me out. 2. I don't know how to say it. Am I being unfair by not giving a two week notice? He wouldn't let me work it anyway. There's no way I could go two weeks with no salon to take my clients to. Please tell me how to handle this in a fair by smart way.



pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

you don't owe him anything
Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 4:10:10 PM

based on what you have been saying about this person you work for, i would advise you to make sure you have everything you need to move on, and tell him the end of work saturday, on your way out the door. you were the only one being professional in this situation from the beginning, and he WILL kick you out the door as soon as you tell him you are leaving. also don't tell him where you are going, so he can't sabotage you.


i would never give this advise to someone who worked in a salon that was run professionally, but this 'boss' of yours is a real piece of work.just gather up your belongings at the end of the day, and say, i'm moving on... this was my last day.buh bye.


you are making a great move! good luck to you in your new place!!



julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 5:49:46 PM
Thanks pixanne, that's exactly what I needed to hear and that's how I'm going to handle it. I try so hard to take the high road but in this case it has gotten me nowhere. I'll let you know how it goes.

heatherdazy
Posts: 320
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 8:58:29 PM
I agree you shouldn't give a two week notice.

When I gave mine, my hours were cut to only when I already had clients on the books. When someone called to make or move their appt, they were told I'd already left the salon and booked with other stylists for time slots when I wouldn't be in.

Finally, I came in and noticed someone had used my flat iron and left it on then wrapped the cord up wrong so it had a little melted spot. I packed my stuff and left.

It's not unheard of for owners/managers to pack your stuff up for you if you're leaving--can you imagine how they'd probably just throw things? Forget that!

russnyc
Posts: 1132
Platinum Member

Leaving
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2009 9:27:53 AM
1. They will never let you work the last two weeks and it's perfectly legal- This is similar to when a corporation boxes up the office of a worker and has security remove them from the building upon termination.

It is to secure all information and to keep you from rallying other employees to leave as well.

2. When you start your new job, encourage EVERY SINGLE client to find you on Facebook, using your first and last name on the business card. You can never be sued or taken to court for this because the client is actually seeking you out, you aren't seeking them.


Any information given through Facebook is protected by "friendship" as long as you don't use the salons' name or logo to promote yourself throguh Facebook. (you can say where you work and respond, but I wouldn't offer discounts or market through Facebook to protect the friendship quality of it if challenged in court.)

3. Times are changing, salons have A LOT MORE to lose when a stylist leaves. If at all possible, take the time to write an email about what you liked and disliked about the salon in a sensible (non catty) manner, wait two weeks for things to cool, and pop it in the mail.

In a corporate environment, this is called an exit interview. Believe it or not, VERY FEW salon owners realize the problems they cause.

By pointing them out, you may make your former coworker's lives much easier or even gain respect form your old boss years later. Salon owners LISTEN when you do stuff like this, just make sure you threw a compliment in there somewhere LOL.

Finally, NO JOB IS PERFECT. There is a delicate balance with every job, each to be respected differently based on where you are in your career. It's a lot like investing, when you are young, you take more risk and less money by seeking benefits like education.

When you are older and your career can shoulder the costs, the priority becomes retirement and health related.

ALWAYS be open and educated, and willing to take risks. The MOMENT that you start fearing change or turning outside opportunities away YOUR BOSS WILL HAVE THE UPPER HAND OVER YOUR CAREER.

A boss that can strike fear in you is a short lived boss that has severed all confidence in his team and is a dicatator to the weak. You NEVER want to let your career slip away like this.

ALWAYS have more than one pot cooking. If you like doing updos and makeup, MARKET it with AND without your salon. If you are into theater and like to volunteer to do hair in play, MAKE SURE your boss knows this ahead of time and that you promote the salon as well.

If you want to be an educator, MAKE SURE your boss is aware of all the benefits having an in salon educator offers AND outline the fact that you can't work 7 days a week!

We CHOOSE every day to get up and go to work at the same job. The moment it becomes something you don't like anymore it's because you didn't spell things out properly ahead of time, or lost control of your own career.

NEVER let anyone else but yourself steer your career.

Russ H.
Colorist at the Roy Teeluck Salon
57th & Madison Avenue, Manhattan NYC

"There are no ugly women, only lazy ones."
-Helena Rubenstein

6618molly
Posts: 68

Movin' on up....
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2009 11:34:36 AM

Julieann,

I just want to say I'm very impressed with you and the folks that have taken the time to respond to your dilemma. Russ has offered some great advise, sounds like some is from experience, Heather, pixanne, Humburto and Sarah, Heidi and da-luckiest. I also just wanted to wish you good luck, and to hang in. I'm sure you will overcome and learn. I love facebook and while a novice I'm learning...what a great way to network and show off a few styles. Anyone that would like to join mine, or don't mind my joining their's would be wonderful. A special thanks to BTC for this forum....

willyboy1@aol.com

 


bill in az

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2009 12:44:31 PM
Wow, so much to think about. I have to say I truly appreciate the honest approach I'm getting from everyone here. The perspective and insight and advice of these posts is like gold. Russ you are so right about letting someone else have control of my career. I won't ever let that happen again.

russnyc
Posts: 1132
Platinum Member

Thanks
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2009 1:28:33 PM
I'd like to point this one thing out, hoping beyond hope that a special someone has read this post.

We all make mistakes, the best ones are those you catch before they can dent your career. I am no angel, I'm not the top billing colorist in my shop yet, nor have I gotten where I need to go yet.

I don't always follow my own advice, I've always respected that this life is about choice. Sometimes, the only way we can find the border between acceptable and unacceptable is to make a mistake.

I honor all those that have taught me well by coming back here time and time again to contribute because I think it makes a difference.

I'd like to encourage everyone to give selflessly, believe it or not, at the end of the day you do indeed make a difference in the way the world turns.


Russ H.
Colorist at the Roy Teeluck Salon
57th & Madison Avenue, Manhattan NYC

"There are no ugly women, only lazy ones."
-Helena Rubenstein

julieann
Posts: 34

I did it
Posted: Saturday, May 09, 2009 2:26:32 PM

Well everybody it's over, or just beginning depending on perspective.  Yesterday after work I told my boss I needed to talk to him.  We walked outside to the parking lot and in my calmest voice I told him I was leaving.  I explained that in the three years I've worked there I have not been able to build my business even close to what it should be.   I explained that I felt it was unethical for him to cut my clients for half off and free and while that wasn't the only reason I was leaving it was  certainly part of it.  I told him that  I believe if he will do this once he will do it again.  To go after the clients of the salon down the street is business but actively pursuing the clients of the person working next to you is unacceptable.  He did not fly into a rage like I feared he would.  He was very upset that I had found out about him doing my clients and demanded that I tell him how I knew.  He began to give me different reasons why he did it but the bottom line is if he felt it was an ok thing to do he would have put their names on the book and not tried so desperately to hide it from me.  He then began a string of lies that made me want to cry but I didn't!  He said that the reason I'm not sucessful is because I've never subscribed to doing hair his way.  He told me that my regular clients call him all the time complaining about their hair.  (why oh why would they keep coming to me then?)  There's much more in the way of angry words but it makes me too sad to type it out.  He said "you're clients will never follow you, you know they won't".   He demanded the key and I handed it over, we went back to the shop and I collected my things.  I'll admit I was shook up by his words because even when you know it's not true, hearing things like that out loud has an affect.  After I left I called my Tuesday appts. to make sure they had gotten my card and knew when their appt was.  EVERY one of them is eagerly coming with me.  Time will tell about the rest.  Several of my clients have followed me from beauty school.  They gladly accepted the price increase from the beauty academy and have stuck with me.  This gives me confidence that they will be willing to move with me.  Last night my husband helped me bring my things into the new salon.  The owner was  there to greet us and had been working all afternoon to get my station ready. 


 I have to say to all of you that I could not have done this without all the positive feedback, advice and encouragement from you- people I've never even met.  I'm going to continue to use your marketing advice and everything  else you've posted here.  Think about me on Tuesday!    A hearfelt thank you to you all.  Julie



6618molly
Posts: 68

"Take this job and shove it !!!"
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2009 8:43:54 AM
Congratulations and good luck Julieann. I'm sure you'll do well.  I hope you'll let us know how things are going.
bill in az

chadfromnc_2000
Posts: 136
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, May 15, 2009 3:53:39 PM

CONGRATS!!!!


just wondering are you a booth renter?



julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Friday, May 15, 2009 9:16:11 PM
I wasn't but I am now. I

da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

YaY!
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2009 9:52:46 PM
I'm glad to hear you're going to a new salon! I switched myself and while it's tough starting fresh, it's been the best think I could do. I've only been at my new shop 2 weeks and my clients got their haircut before I left my old shop, but time will tell if they come. I saw one of my clients passing by my new shop and she said that my ex-co workers told her I moved out of state. It's just a part of our biz: messy ex co-workers. This is your time to shine and make sure you make the brightest light. :-D

julieann
Posts: 34

Posted: Saturday, May 16, 2009 7:43:52 PM
I wanted to let you all know that my first week went really well. All of my clients with scheduled appointments showed up. Many of them got their card in the mail and called to book their next appt. Some of them even just called to congratulate me and let me know they were coming along. I offered a first time bonus of $10 off at the new salon and two of my clients wouldn't even take it- they insisted on paying the full price! I'm starting to hear the truth from my clients about things they never liked at the other place- they just put up with it because they liked their hair. Here's a weird thing- my previous boss and co-worker have not tried to contact any of them! I was sure they would call them and offer them all kinds of everything to get them to keep coming there but they didn't. I don't need to borrow trouble but that surprised me. Now I have five weeks rent free left to build my business- I hope I can do it. Keep the suggestions coming, I appreciate it all soooo much. Julie

pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

Posted: Saturday, May 16, 2009 9:55:29 PM
so glad to hear that the transition went well!onwards and upwards!

LunaChelle
Posts: 3

yeah i know how you feel...
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 8:11:32 PM

i had a similar situation to where the owner would talk down to stylists. She would gossip about employees with clients and other stylists.. and she would gossip about her clients with other clients and employees. She'd get involved with peoples relationships and try to fill peoples head with negative junk in an attempt to sabotoge relationships. She would go and pick out "issues" with the hair styles and colors other stylists did to the clients who were actually happy before she did it so the stylist had to redo work.. then she would proceed with saying "i'm good at what i do because I..." and go on and on about how great she was. She also blocked me from getting clients by having the receptionist tell my clients i was booked for two weeks when i wasn't. So i made zero dollars in two weeks. I found that out by a client that followed me to a better salon. She would tell me how i "couldn't cut hair" and i wasn't that good at anything yet when i moved to a top 200 salon, i was praised and told how amazing my work was by the top stylists in the joint. SO.. there you go.


The best thing and ONLY thing you can do is just leave. To hell with what is said about you after. It's not worth killing your drive and passion for what you do.


 



6618molly
Posts: 68

Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 9:14:47 PM

That's wonderful news Julieann. Your ex-boss is such a bad example for the many, many good managers and leaders in our industry. You have set the bar just a little higher for those in your former position. No matter what if you set your goals and follow your heart you'll be a winner. If you ever decide to move to Phoenix we"d be proud to have you join our salon!


Bill


bill in az