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Posted By:stelgem on: 6/12/2011 1:51:47 AM


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Author: Thread: No honour
stelgem
Posts: 7

No honour
Posted: Sunday, June 12, 2011 1:51:47 AM
You put your trust in your staff and work with them for years and then all of a sudden they turn on you. A member of staff for over 4 years has left stealing all the client details and contacting them telling them where she is now. I don't know what to do. Should I contact them and let them know she stole the information? Should I go to the police? I am very upset and angry too.

pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, June 12, 2011 7:22:51 AM
people are not property. creating a following is essential to every hairdresser,and asking them to follow you is natural. do you have policies in writing that were signed at hiring?if not, no rules were broken.it is the nature of most hairdressers to be restless and move on, looking for greener pastures. try to take the high road with the clients, offer them another stylist and keep it professional.they will go where they feel most comfortable.

stelgem
Posts: 7

People are not property
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 5:37:36 AM
They may not be property but their information is. It is theft to lift confidential information from a salon.

keiferkat
Posts: 249
Bronze Member

Stealing...
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 6:00:09 AM
When you said stealing all the client details did she make a copy or take your copy?  Was it just her clientel or all clients? Clients will go where they want to anyway. I would send the clients a nice postcard with a coupon for their next service! You have every right. You can pursue legal action but it would take a lot of energy and you may not win. I am sorry this happened to you.

gd
Posts: 806
Gold Member

Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 2:56:04 PM

Although this may be natural for many stylists, it does not make it right and it does not make it legal. Putting an ad in the paper with your picture letting clients know that you have moved, is much different than taking client information from the salon and sending out letters to all of these clients. Employees collecting and using client information for the purpose of taking salon clients, is theft. There are business laws covering theft of a businesses propietary information. It is not necessary to have employees sign anything regarding taking client information when they leave employment. That is like having employees sign a statement that they cannot take salon equipment when they leave. This is the law and stylists should be aware of what the law is.


This is what I was told by my attorney, as to the best way to handle this type of situation. You or your attorney can contact the owner of the salon where the stylist is now employed.  Advice them in writing, that this stylist has taken your salon business information illegally and has used that information to contact your clients. Explain that you will file a lawsuit against  the salon if they continue to employ the stylist and benefit from the theft of this information. It doesn't matter if they are renting or an employee. I would do this to every salon this stylist goes to work. This is being done more often than you think in our industry with great results.




stelgem
Posts: 7

Thank God.
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 6:58:55 AM
Thank you for your replies. After the first reply i felt very down and thought i was alone in how i felt. I will pursue this matter further. Pixanne, i feel that you are probably not a salon owner and you don't know how it feels to be robbed. I have invested 6 years of my life, over half a million euros and you think that a stylist has the right to walk away with the profits of my investment? The stylist was paid very well to do her job and that was to look after the salons clients. She had no right to help herself to that information.

pixanne
Posts: 1196
Platinum Member

Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 9:30:12 AM
you are right, i'm not a salon owner, i'm a hardworking stylist who gives my all to my clients. i would expect them to follow me wherever i go. i a commissioned employee of the salon,not a salaried one. what i bring in is what i get half of. no more no less.that's what i bring in, not what is given to me.the salon is the roof over my head, and my co workers are part of the team. we all work to the same goal for the betterment of all concerned. when a stylist leaves,their clients are welcome to follow or stay in the salon. it is their choice.the best way to go about dealing with it is to figure out what could have been done to retain this employee. just an opinion from the other side of the 50%.

stelgem
Posts: 7

No Honour
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 9:53:42 AM
The said former employee was paid a salary unlike yourself and knew the clients belonged to the salon and not her. We spoke before she left and she said she understood this and agreed she would leave professionally. It now transpires that she had planned this some time ago. To add fuel to the fire i have found out today that she is bad mouthing me telling people that i had not paid her for the last 2 months! After 3 weeks since her departure i have had no calls requesting her. If you still think she did the right thing then we will just agree to disagree.

jadekitty
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 6:34:06 PM
I don't think that Pixianne is saying that what she did was right, just that it is over and done with. As an owner myself, this is an issue that I've struggled with through my own career. As an owner, do we take the high road and tell the clients who call where their stylist has gone, or do we lie and say we have no idea? In my salon, we offer to book with someone else, and if the client is not interested, we release the information regarding where the stylist is now. As far as trashing you to clients, it's all too common. I don't allow my staff to trash my former stylist (only one has left in 4 years) and many of "her" clients have now returned to us.
At the risk of starting a whole new debate, say that you hire a stylist with clientele. If that stylist leaves, are the clients that came with her now the salon's property, or does the information belong to the stylist since she was the one who brought those clients in the first place?
I'm unsure of the laws in your area. In Ontario, unless the stylist signs an agreement stating that client information is salon property, the salon owner has no leg to stand on. The laws vary from place to place - but Pixianne makes a good point as well. As owners, we need to figure out why the employee left in the first place, not stress ourselves over what that employee is doing now. Her lack of professionalism will come back to bite her in the ass sooner or later. Keep moving forward, and best of luck with your salon!
"Keep smiling - it makes people wonder what you're up to."

doit
Posts: 64

how do you know they stole info
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 3:37:34 PM

Don't  be so sure they stole info.  I was fired for standing up to a bullying salon owner.  I took nothing and never had computer access to formulas, addresses,etc.  I found 90% of my clients via the internet.  As for formulas, I started from scratch, but I had done most of these clients for so long I had an idea what to do.   People go where they want.  Yes you provided a roof over their head and supplies, but your stylist built and maintained the relationship.  Most people go to a salon because of the stylist. 



stelgem
Posts: 7

Being sure.
Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2011 1:33:21 AM
There is no confusion as to whether or not information was stolen. Clients are coming in showing me the text messages asking me where she got their number from. She has also stolen the clients colour cards. As for a stylist arriving with their own clients they would already have their phone numbers. As i understand it (and i have worked for salons for over 20 years before opening my own), if you are paid a wage, you work for the salon doing the salons clients. If you rent a chair or are paid commission then you work out all the details when your contract is drawn up. A stylist can have a blog, twitter, Facebook page etc its not hard to be found if they want to be, so if clients want to get in touch they can and also we live in a small town where the local papers and magazines charge 70 euros a month for advertising. So why steal? I am not an unreasonable boss and don't make profit without reward. The advice i am looking for is how to move on now and the correct way i should approach the clients who have been contacted by said former employee. A clever marketing strategy? What to say on the phone to them etc... Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
As to why she left, she was offered a chair in a salon where she will collect 90% of her takings! I have never heard of such a deal, don't know how that could work and am in mind to go and get a job there myself! I think there is an idea that she will be taking over in the near future. All this information i have gathered after her leaving. If she had told me before about this then i would have put away all the client info and made sure she could not have access to them but at the same time would have wished her the best of luck and offer my support if needed. But she didn't, she planned this out got what she wanted and just left. But it puzzles me why she is now slandering my name by telling people that the reason she left was because i have not paid her for the last 2 months. My wife and i were involved in a serious car accident over 2 years ago and we both spent months in hospital during which staff left as did clients. We have worked hard over the last 2 years to bring our salon back to anything near what it was and have used up all our savings and our nest egg. She never once didn't get paid. We are both left very upset by her but are still smiling and are looking forward with our new staff members to a new beginning.

gd
Posts: 806
Gold Member

Posted: Monday, June 20, 2011 1:39:11 PM

As for how to handle clients when a stylist leaves, you have to be pro-active. Do mail-outs to their clients and offer an incentive to the clients. When clients call, explain that the stylist is no longer there and you cannot give out any information about an ex-employee. If this stylist took the salons client profile cards, that is theft of salon property and she can be prosecuted. I would contact an attorney and have them contact her new salon.


If a stylist brings clients with them into a salon, and it is done properly and legally, once the client is done in the salon, the clients information becomes the legal property of the salon and the same rules apply.


To the person that contacted the salons clients over the internet, contacting the salons clients in any way is illegal.




cyn858
Posts: 10

no honour
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 6:30:18 AM
I am a stylist/owner and recently I had this happen to me. Over the thirteen years I have been in business this has happened to me about 7 times since I do have low turnover luckily. However, the first few times it happened it was with girls that I took from before school through to building up to busiest stylist in my salon. I trained them, mentored them, paid for education, paid for so many personal extras to help them out, etc...I was like another parent and they worked hard made money and I loved them like family. I was devastated when they left! It took alot of business education and time for me to get a thicker skin over the years and realize people move on in this business, change is a part of being a hairdresser and to take it personally is my own fault I need to learn to get over that. So, I no longer do "more" than I should but I am a good employer and fair.  I work sided by side with my employees and I tell all employees if I can sweep or shampoo for a co worker so can everyone else, I encourage team work and we do work great together. Our clients see this and love it, they love the atmosphere in our salon, so after these two stylists left to go to a "better opportunity" we sent out thank you cards to the clients they sercviced stating that we appreciated all their business in the past and offer a discount if they would like to try another talented stylist in our sALON. To my surprise, I would say that 75% off their client base came back with other stylists in my salon and rebooked! I have heard from many of the clients that although they really liked the stylist as a person they were not 100% satisfied with their hair service! the grass is not always greener, there is only so much your salon owner and salon can do to get you busy and for clients to be loyal to you personally, there is alot of  competition out there and sometimes the customer likes where they are going and dont want to go to another place. Btw these two stylist have not been at their new salon for even one month and are moving to a budget chain salon. One is a certified redken colorist with 10 yrs experience and the other is about the same yrs. in business, but flip flopping hours constantly moving clients and not being available at the clients convenience and just doing mediocre work is what hurt them, not working at my salon.

stelgem
Posts: 7

Moving on
Posted: Tuesday, June 28, 2011 8:31:35 AM
Hi cyn858. I understand how that must have left you feeling. Our salon has worked hard over the last 6 years to provide the best service in town and we do. I have full faith in ourselves and our new stylists to rise above the back stabbing and greed that goes on. Whilst it is a shame that people feel the need to steal and cheat to get ahead i also believe it is not the way to go in business and they will fail sooner or later as greed gets the better of them. In a way they have done us a favour because they have already shown their true colours (pardon the pun)! But a burnt bridge is just that and in a small town like my town word gets round and what comes around will come back round. gd, thanks for your comments. We have an advertising campaign out now that will have an impact that is sure to make a change. The law here is no help unless clients launch a protest against the theft of their information themselves. So i have now made this information only available to my wife and myself EVER. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.