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Posted By:hues4you on: 10/17/2005 7:45:54 PM


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hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE EVENTS
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2005 7:45:54 PM

I had a bad day...............yeah!!!!!!! Ever had one of those days, in the salon or spa, when everything was just off??????????  Consultation off, booking was all wrong, clients all showed up late, nobody liked their services?  You just felt like you should of stayed at home, or even worse by days end - like you should reconsider your profession???  Don't worry we all have.  It happens a couple times a  year.  Come here to let it out and have someone give you that pep talk to get you going again!

Cindy Farr Hester, co-moderator

www.behindthechair.com


 



runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2005 5:52:47 AM

Well I just can't take it anymore!  I think I got into this business too late in life.  I see my book building more and more which is wonderful.  But it takes so long to make money in this business.  Insurance is always a joke!  We have a crappy program we have to pay for ourselves.  My boss is a nice person, who is NEVER around, she doesn't advertise, and all my clients are legally the salons.  I don't think I can switch places and start all over again.  I'll just knock myself back 2 years!  I am such a hard worker and I hate to just give up but I need to get on with life here!  I'm applying in a corporate office this week.  If I get the position I'll triple what I'm make, get full benefits for the whole family, further education is completely paid for, and they tell you how much you will make for the next 6 years. 

I wasn't current looking but when someone waves this in your face it hard to say no to the steady pay and benefit.  I hate to give up hair though... 

oh how my head spins with confusion!



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

runswithscissors
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2005 6:41:38 AM

I knew we needed a place to vent!

Many, many years ago I almost did the same thing you did.  I had had it, and I said enough with this business, and knew I could make more money in the corporate world with set salary and benefits and I almost walked away and did it.

Now, I have been in this business 18 years, I did not leave, never knew I would end up being a single mom supporting a 7 year old with no support, being independently employed, happy, paying my own benefits and still making more money than I ever would  in the corporate world.  So hold on if you love doing hair - OK??  How's that for a series of unfortunate events?  Our industry can be very good to us if we stick with us.

Did you mean in you statement your clients are leaving the salon?  Why do you think that is?  You said you got into this business too late?  Do you mind telling me how old you are?  I personally don't believe there is an age limit, clients grow with us, some of them prefer maturity.  I agree it does take time to make money in this business.  But if your books are building, you are on your way.  The best advertisement is your clients.  You have to cultivate your own clientele.  Ask  your clients for referrals.  I have to run off to work now.  However, don't go off and do something harsh yet........you had a bad day.  Sounds like you have started something good.  I'll check back in later and hopefully others will offer advice.  Remember, if you quit now, and start another job, you will have to start all over rebuilding again if you re-enter.

CindyFarr Hester  co-moderator

www.behindthechair.com



mrsbonica26@gmail.com
Posts: 4

Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2005 12:37:44 PM
I think everyone goes through this at some point! I have days like that all the time, where I think about how much better off I would be somewhere else. Whenever I have a frustrating client or do something that doesn't come out right, I go through that same thing. But I always stick with it. It's hard to just up and change completely....I don't think there is any other profession out there in comparison. Keep with it!

runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2005 7:15:20 PM

My clients are great, none of them are leaving the salon.  Things are improving finacially very, VERY slowly!  I've been doing this for 2 years now.  And the way I look at is it going to be some time before I'm making a descent living.  I'm 27, married and between the two of us we're just barley getting by.  I'm just fed up.  I used to have the comfy office job and have alot of days I regret leaving.  I have a problem with my hip and although it doesn't give me too many problems now my doctor says it is going to catch up.  Which is what he used to tell me anyway since I haven't been able to afford a doctor in the past few years. 

Sorry it sounds like I'm whinning and thats not what I'm trying to do.  Its kinda sick how this business sucks you in.  With applying for this job in the back of my head this moring I went in today thinking; "I just don't want to be here"; then at the end of the day I had my bag on my shoulder ready to leave when someone asked me to give them a hand.  I was happy to stay and jump into assistant mode and started thinking "Why would I ever want to leave"?...so confused...



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

runswithscissors
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2005 7:37:12 PM

It's kinda like..........torn b/w 2 lovers.........but it's your job.  Your future.  Going back to pitch in being part of the team shows your loyalty.  And your team spirit.  You are going to have to do some soul searching.  Fast money does not usually come in this business.  But it is a great sign you are building your books quickly.  This means you do have talent and a good attitude.  Great things come to those that wait.  As for the benefits.  Since you are married - can you husband carry you on his insurance plan?  If not, have you looked into Blue Cross/Blue Sheild Private health insurance for your state?  It may be more affordable for you.  Please check into it, I believe you can apply online.  Keep asking your clients for referrals.  This is the way to keep building.  Follow your heart and dreams.

Cindy Farr Hester  co-moderator

www.behindthechair.com



mc
Posts: 2360
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 7:44:57 AM
WHY was my post deleted?

G Crabby ~~~~~mc~~~~~



TLH
Posts: 287
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 9:31:09 AM

I googled "individual insurance" and other phrases (with my state) and came up with 4 companies that offer insurance to independent people. Check out what's available in your state, your city. If nothing else, you can get major medical for not much (for the big things that go wrong). You might just find something affordable...



char
Posts: 5

I've been there, am there
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 4:34:47 PM
It IS frustrating sometimes. I have been in the business 28 years. I just moved to a new state and am starting over. I have had an awsome time doing hair. The last two years I made so much money! Now I am starting over and I am basically paying money to work. I am buying my own ads, sending out direct mail, sitting around all day ,waiting for clients to come in the door in a tough new market. But... In one month I am starting to see progress. some days I want to give up but I know I can do it. Clients refer other clients. I work with an awsome bunch of people. I don't mind shampooing for them or whatever. It is hard to mentally cope with not having the success after you have had it. I think 27 years old is not too old  to be starting. If you hang in there this industry is fabulous for a working mom. It can be flexible in hours, so when you need to go to a school meeting or whatever it can be done. If you are in an upscale salon, keep up your education you can charge a decent amount for your work and actually make a great living $ to hours compared to the coperate world. Health care can be an issue, Lucky if you have a spouse that has it.

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

Char
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 5:18:15 PM

Dear Char-

Sounds like you have a great attitude.  I am sure you will build in no time.  And you are young :)  All you must do is stay positive.  People gravitate towards a smiling helpful face.  Spend your time while building doing killer consultations, and you will reap the rewards with referrals.  Good luck to you.

Cindy Farr Hester  moderator

www.behindthechair.com



loriems
Posts: 1

Desperately Seeking Advice
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 8:16:10 PM

I don't know what to do!

I love my job, I just graduated from my salon's training program and have been a stylist (cutter) for 4 months now.  It has been going good and my business has been building slowly but surely. 

On the otherhand, my boss feels that I am not doing well at all --and it has nothing to do w/ my technical ability.  He feels that the reason why my business is building so slowly is that I don't promote myself enough when I'm not at work (I've gotten friends and some people I've met to come in, but not many because my prices at the salon are too expensive for them) and he feels that I have poor client interaction skills(I love people, I love getting to know people, I'm positive and friendly,  but I'm not at the point where I can talk through the entire service, I still need to concentrate a little too).  I love what I do and I have agreed w/ my boss to take somekind of class like improv or acting to help w/ client interaction skills and I have been passing out business cards but that still doesn't guarantee that these people will come in for a haircut.  There is a coupon on our salon's website for me and that has drawn a lot of business for me, but he says I am relying on it too heavily. 

If anyone has any ideas of how I can get more business I would greatly appreciate it.  My boss has hinted that if I don't improve in the next 2 months I could lose my job.  I am trying to stay positive, strong, and focused but it is hard, I am sooo depressed and I don't know what to do.  I feel like my boss has already written me off.   I am new to the industry as well, only being a stylist for 4 months.  How long does it normally take to build a strong clientle?

Pleasehelp! 



sarrah
Posts: 149
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 11:44:27 PM
Can you team up with someone else from the salon who is new? Example: Get a cut and color with you and a manicure with so-and-so and receive 20% off or receive "X" products as a gift. Can you develop a referral program such as hand out these cards to people for "X" dollars off and for every three reuturned the original client gets 50% off or a free color or........Be creative. You will build your client base it just takes time. Is there a new business in your area whom you could promote and they could promote you in turn? Good luck. Be patient and hopefully your boss can be patient.


topele
Posts: 52

Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2005 4:53:59 AM

At 27 you still have time, to build a great career.  I came into this in my late 30's. I'll be 40 next month:).  I'm divorced with two children entering H.S.  This is a tough business, but then again what business isn't.  I worked about 15 years in corporate America,  I loved the the steady pay.  But, the constant down sizing that started in the 90's got to be too much.  

I'm now 3 years in this career/business,  At times (many many) I wish for that steady pay check.  But this business is like Mcdonalds,  we have to contantly advertise.  They make millions and everyone knows their name, and still they advertise.  Macy's every week advertising a sale, and still making millions

I am not comfortable appoaching people with my cards(That is a big minus against me).  To help me build, I have hired a girl to distribute flyers for me.  She will be handing out about 200 flyers per day twice a week, 400 flyers weekly.  If does nothing for my business, I don't know what will. 

 



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

loriems
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2005 6:11:48 AM

Welcome to BTC!

Ok I feel ya!  And I have been there!  And I have been thru one of these programs and they are tracking your request %.  And I know you feel all eyes are on you.  All this education is a good thing though.  And you have something wonderful going for you that came to easy that doesn't always for some.......you have great technical skills.  So what I want you to do, is keep telling yourself this over and over again in your mind.  Because this is what you are going to do to build your self esteem - OK?

One of the hardest things for us all to learn is consulting skills.  And I am sure many will post to verify this.  It can take YEARS, we work on it our career.  So what I would like to suggest, is when you are not busy and not handing out cards, I want you to find someone you really, really admire in that salon - a cutter (someone booked) and ask him/her if they do not mind if you hang around when they are working (most will not) because you would like to learn from them because you admire their people skills and cutting skills.  See what they are doing right.  You will see it comes very easy to them, they are having fun, they are not trying too hard.  They are making a connection with their clients and building trust.  You are not going to build hanging in the break room with people waiting on the next walk-in.

Ok, now for you.  Here is just a little pep talk and hopefully others will add more to this.  When you get a new client.  Make eye contact.  Smile.  Shake their hand.  Introduce yourself.  Walk them with you to your station.  Consult with them.  Make sure you know where you are going before you begin.  If they say I just want you take off the split ends, don't just say ok - you can say, ok I can do that - but have you thought of just a few face framing layers.  Nothing major.  Just a little something.  You have to build trust in a new client.  Show them that you will do what they want and suggest a little "something" so when they leave there they look even better, and someone at work tomorrow says "oh did you get your haircut?" it looks good.  This will make them want to come back to you.........Do you see where I am going with this???  You have the ability.   You have the skills.  They would not have walked in that salon if they were not looking for a hairdresser.  Talk to them.  Get to know them.  When you are drying their hair, teach them about the product and teach them how to dry their hair.  Make sure you give them cards and let them know you would like to do their hair again.  They need to know this.  And watch them start rebooking.  When people start complementing them - they will hand those cards out.  People want others to go to who they do.  It's the ultimate compliment. 

So Hang in there..........I have faith.  This is only the beginning.  BTW  I have had bad reviews in beginning too.   Get us posted :)

Cindy Farr Hester  Moderator

www.behindthechair.com



TLH
Posts: 287
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2005 8:38:06 AM
And when doing a consultation, I always stand in front of them and look at them eye to eye, not thru the mirror, at first. I talk face to face, asking about what they do to style their hair at home (if they just wash n wear, you don't want to go for a style that requires flat ironing, etc). Ask what they do for a living. If they are in a corporation vs. an artist (conservative vs. wilder and hipper). Smile and use their first name several times when addressing them. Let them know you really care about them and them alone while they are in your chair. Give a terrific scalp massage and that alone will win you some loyal clients. And whatever you do, if they say 2", don't cut 5". And show them what 2" looks like (clients aren't real good at measuring) because you don't want to shock them. If you think 5" would be better, convince them first and show why it's better. (I'm thinking of all the horror stories clients tell me about stylists who cut off half their hair when they came in for a trim) And the suggestion to watch a seasoned stylist doing a consultation on a new client is a good one. I made up a script at first; it helped when I got tongue-tied.

britboy
Posts: 2083
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, November 06, 2005 10:04:07 AM

Here's a story that will make the most patient stylist angry...

A woman won a raffle prize which I had donated to a local fund- raiser for Katrina releif. She came in last Saturday for her $50.00 service. The color she chose turned out to be too light for her so I offered to re-do it this Thursday for her. She called me 3 hours before the appointment time to tell me that she couldn't make it. Although I require 24 hours notice on cancellations, I was gracious and offered to do it this Saturday morning at 11 a.m.

Of course you know what happened...she didn't show up. I called her that evening after I had finished work and sure enough she answered the cell phone in her pocket. She began to babble about how her car had broken down and how her father had to come and...blah, blah...

I listened patiently and then asked her why she hadn't simply called me on her personal phone in her pocket. Again she began with excuses which I listened to and she kept saying she was sorry. I told her that I had accommodated her switch from the Thursday appointment with only 3 hours notice in order to help her, and that I had lost a valuable Saturday appointment because by not cancelling it, she hadn't allowed me to sell it to someone else. I told her that I would appreciate it if she would mail me a check for the appointment which I had been deprived of selling if she really was sorry, pointing out that saying sorry wasn't the same as showing it.

She then said, 'well my hair doesn't look the right color'...to which I replied, "well that's why we had the appointment that you didn't come for, it's hard for me to correct hair if the client doesn't show up"...so I'd appreciate the check anyways, I was here ready to make you happy, it was your absence that prevented it"

Then she said...'Well I had a gift certicifate didn't I'?

I replied "yes, but you used up that credit by not coming today, and in addition, for not cancelling you owe me for the lost appointment I would have sold to someone else...get it"?

She said 'well we both lost out'...and I replied,"No, only I lost out, you lost nothing but I lost my ability to sell that time slot to someone else...there was no cost to you, but there was to me"...

I explained that in the small town where I have my salon, which she recently moved to, it's very difficult to be a small business owner and that we will not survive if this type of behavior exists, we expect fair treatment from those who make appointments as do those who come to our businesses and that to be fair and make things square, she should compensate me for my lost time.

She said 'Well, I won't pay for something I didn't get', and I explained that I was asking her to compensate me for what I didn't get, the benefit of a courtesy cancellation... 

Finally, seeing that I was getting nowhere and that I didn't want any further conversation, I said "If you don't understand and won't pay me for my time, please don't call me again"...

She turned very nasty and hissed..."I didn't intend to anyway"...

Of course I just hung up the phone without further comment.

Some days you can't win, I'm sure she'll be around town now badmouthing me. At least some Katrina victim got her moneyand some good came out of it?






m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Sunday, November 06, 2005 12:17:29 PM
they will just never 'get it'.  wish i could have your quick wit- unfortunately even the 'kindest, simplest' effort to make the point wasn't understood.  good riddance to these rude people.

ponitail
Posts: 141
Bronze Member

Posted: Sunday, November 06, 2005 4:52:10 PM

wow how rude! I have found over the years that people are much more respectful of your time when they are paying for it to begin with. I have also never found that any of the gift certificates that I have donated to any organizations have given me a permanent client. they come to claim their service with me and usually do not return. They also seem to be more difficult when they are in my chair. Just my observation!

 

 


patience in one minute of anger can prevent one hundred days of sorrow!

m2
Posts: 1104
Platinum Member

Posted: Monday, November 07, 2005 11:50:18 AM

i agree!

although they have "paid/donated" towards "winning" the gift certificate it's like you're still 'free' to them.   "free" doesn't mean much anymore to people.



runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

still doing hair
Posted: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 11:57:07 AM

Well I came very close to getting that corporate job but they couldn't hire me because my mom works for the same company... Maybe its a sign... 

I still would like to do hair.  And not untill I talked to my family about leaving this profession did I really get their opinnions about what I do... I guess everyone (4 parents 4 inlaws) think hair is a joke.  That I was immature for chosing this career path.  I was applying for that corporate job on a whim and I didn't get it, but now my family is actully job searching for me!  Its driving me a bit mad, but also driving me to do better and prove them wrong!

I would still like a job that offers benifits, vacation, sick days... that kinda stuff.  But there are only two big salons in my area that offer that and I know thoughs  places are not for me.  I preferr to work in a smaller, friendlier enviroment.  I know that the chain salons in my area do have good benifits but would that be heading to far in the other direction?  What could I expect from working for a chain?  Good and Bad?  Anyone?



ponitail
Posts: 141
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 5:37:48 PM

One of the best things about this industry is the creativity and the freedom of expression. I have found bigger salons or "chains" can hinder this yes benefits are nice and all the rest of it and I have been in that situation, however I like smaller salons better and I have found it easier to keep clients in smaller environments (provided there is a need) the bigger ones can sometimes juggle clients so that they are used to seeing anyone (no knock to anyone that is successful in a chain, this is just my experience) I worked out my bills for teeth, prescriptions and sick days and then doubled it, and then made a goal to have that amount of money per year in the bank(you'd be surprised at how little we actually need), but then again it depends were you live, I am in Canada and we have OHIP coverage that we pay through a certain amount of taxes per year. But see about private insurance or maybe a small salon would do group benefits look at all the options. Then decide. And as far as your family goes remind them of their comments and feeling towards your choice when they want their hair done. No one has the right to make you feel inadequate for pursuing your dreams, some people change their profession 5 times in their life and how many people have you met that 20 years later are sad and wished that they did what they wanted to do in the first place only to realize that the can't take a pay cut to do what they want because of family and responsibility. I don't know, I am not so sure that job security exists any more. Good luck!


patience in one minute of anger can prevent one hundred days of sorrow!



habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Wednesday, November 09, 2005 11:56:24 AM
i turned ladys hair green one day. awful day not my fault

runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

nevermind
Posted: Sunday, November 13, 2005 7:03:35 AM


runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 5:42:05 AM
Man, I fried someone hair.  This guy came into me w/ THICK shoulder length hair.  He had been dieing at home and was kinda orange and an inch of black regrowth.  He wanted to be a very ashy blonde.  I told him I would have to bleach his head out first and because it was so thick it would take me a few steps to do that.  I foiled every hair in just the front of his head because I knew it couldn't I couldn't do the back before the front needed to be rinsed.  But the 1st 2 foils where completely fried.  I finish the head, toned w/ 8na, gave him a conditioning treatment, and also sent him home with one.  I explained to problem and told him  I wanted to trim it and he wouldn't let me, he said I'll come in tomarrow.  He called the next day and said it was breaking and wanted to give it a rest.  I don't blame him if he doesn't ever come back... But my brain won't rest about this!!!  Every time I roll over in my sleep I see his hair!!!  I feel like such a F*up!  Blah this sucks!! 

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

Runwithscissors
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 6:06:37 AM

Dear runwithscissors-

OK- now for the pep talk.  You have a conscience.  Which I hope we all do.  And that is a good thing.  We have all gone somewhere where we wish we have not.  You had a plan you thought it out.  You had good intentions.  Now.....you are going to have to stop beating yourself up.  Think of how many years you have been in this business and how many happy customers you have had.  Think of how many people call in the salon and ask for you by name and just breathe in and breate out.  We have all make a bad judgement call from time to time throught our entire career.  Now what I want you to do is to learn from this one.  What could you have done different to keep this from happening?  This is how you are going to heal.  This experience is going to make you better.  Be thankful that he was not a jerk.  If you would like, we could talk about the experience, and your application and how you did it and offer suggestions on how it could of been done different after you explain it better and you break it down a different way so we could all learn together.  You just learned what not to do today.........so you will grow.  Chin up..move forward :)

Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator

www.behindthechair.com



ponitail
Posts: 141
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 7:09:57 PM

That is one thing that you will remember and never do again. We often pay much more attention to the one that we were not happy with instead of the hundreds that turned out amazing. Your sleeplessness will pass I have in the past realized right in the middle of applying a color that it was not the best choice at that point what do you do. Let it process as you pray to the color gods and see if it works. Figure out were you went wrong and understand why this will make you feel better.

 


patience in one minute of anger can prevent one hundred days of sorrow!

mina
Posts: 164
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 7:13:27 PM
great advice ponitail!

mina
Posts: 164
Bronze Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 7:13:29 PM
great advice ponitail!

habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2005 4:38:53 AM
i agree with ponytail ihave question about if you realize in the middle of applying color that you areputting wrong color onshouldn't you remove it and startover?

sarrah
Posts: 149
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2005 2:33:11 PM
It depends how far off your color formula is. For example if your end formula doesn't seem dark enough you can mix up a new formula that compensates for your mistake and apply it right over the color that's on the hair.


habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2005 6:32:01 PM

 



ponitail
Posts: 141
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, November 18, 2005 4:32:56 AM
yes what sarrah is saying, not if you meant to mix blond and oops you grabbed black. I mean smaller things like shoot I should have put in some K concentrate and you realize after it is already on that you should have added it. 
patience in one minute of anger can prevent one hundred days of sorrow!

habib
Posts: 427
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, November 18, 2005 5:05:59 AM
I agree ponitail     I rather see it  removed and started over. might be embarrassing at first but the client will dissapointed in you worse if itisn not resolve before it gets too hard to fix   sarrahs fix  good but it only works one way

runswithscissors
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, November 21, 2005 7:20:36 AM

Hi Everyone!  I wanted to let you know the guy who's hair I fried called on Saturday.  He said his hair didn't break and he likes his color.  He loves the products I gave him and I think he'll even be back to the shop.  I can't believe I lost so much sleep and not to mention sanity over this! 

Now I have a question, suppose his hair totally broke off and he was completely unhappy.  Could he sue me?  How can I legally protect myself in these cases?  I know how important a strand test is and also I need to tell some people "no its just not going to work".  But mistakes happen.  What happens to a stylist who's client is interested in taking legal action??



nicole
Posts: 125
Bronze Member

question
Posted: Monday, November 21, 2005 8:21:22 PM

this is for runswithscissors, I don't get it, how are your clients legally the salons clients?   I don't get it, they are your clients and if you ever left that salon you should tell your clients where you are going, because I'm sure you'd have clients who wouldn't want to give you up.   I'm sorry, clients belong to whomever they want to belong and about 98 percent or more would say they belong to the stylist not the salon.

As for the can a client sue you? oh sure they can.  I have read many stories about people in the US and Canada who are suing their TR technicians because their hair broke off and because their lack of knowledge or proper testing resulted in hair loss.  Here's the thing, if you did not perform a strand test it can possibly be thought of as negligence, you neglected to do something you were supposed to do and because you did not do that x happened.  The TR examples are great to explain this, many newbie tech's don't test the hair at all, just look and say "yup it's do-able" and many have not asked the client about chemical services in the past.  Improper strand test and none at all can totally cause breakage to the hair, again tech's fault for not doing it though supposed to, same with not asking about previous services, some relaxers and Tr formula's don't mix and cause the hair to break, don't ask the client again tech's fault.  It's kinda like a doctor, you the stylist/tech are supposed to be the expert and has the upper hand and knowledge.  THe hard part can sometimes be telling a client something won't work, especially if their hair fails the test, sometimes clients don't get it that it can't be done because of the likelyhood of the hair breaking due to it being extremely weak for example.  You have to stick to your guns and tell them no...if they go elsewhere and someone messes it up and does the service after you said no, then trust me they will kick themselves for not listening to you.....

On the topic of stylists and what clients look for check out this site.....you will have to scroll to the bottom to read some of the great articles, the "what clients look for in a stylist" is awesome but wayyyyyy at the bottom, but worth the read.

www.tigigirl.blogspot.com

I'm a fan of the site!



nicole
Posts: 125
Bronze Member

flyers
Posted: Monday, November 21, 2005 8:27:35 PM
Sorry I read about flyers, and I have to say that it irritates many people I know when they see people standing outside a salon handing out flyers...half of them throw it toward you.  People have tried to hand flyers to every person walking past the salon, this one guy walking behind me was really irritated by the fact that people are basically pushing papers in their face.  I don't think the flyer thing does too well....I think many know the best way to advertise is your clients word of mouth, or have a small add in the phone book, even the online one.  Having a salon website is great too.  I don't mean to offend anyone who hands out posters though, just saying that it can be annoying for people and it must be tough when you see people just drop it.

xpressionista
Posts: 97

nicole
Posted: Monday, November 21, 2005 8:43:21 PM
Legally, the clients belong to a salon as long as the stylist is an employee of the salon.  a salon employee is someone who is hired by the salon to perform services on the clients and who is being paid by the salon.  the salon usually covers products, advertising, assistant wages, etc, so basically the employee just brings his/her shears.  the employee is more than welcome to drum up business for him/herself, which will help build up a bigger paycheck and request clientele.  In most employment agreements, the salon will put in writing that all customer info is property of said salon.  this makes it illegal for the stylist to contact clients on their own.  if you plan on leaving, you may tell clients where youll be located, but you cannot use salon records to solicit business.when you inform clients that you are leaving, the choice is theirs to get the info to follow you.  you cannot pass out cards, fliers, etc. in the salon.

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

2 cents
Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2005 6:08:45 AM

I am just going to throw my 2 cents in here in regards to putting chems on damaged hair for whatever it is worth.  And this is only my opinion.  But I do feel very strongly about this.  If I have a client that requests a chemical service that is new to me, because none of my existing clientele would have hair in this shape (remember I have been doing this a long time) and their hair is questionable - and I felt their hair could not handle a chem, and their was any risk of further damage, I would refuse the service.  Period.  If there was any chance of a chemical service doing breakage to a clients hair, I would during the consultation simply explain this too them, and tell them I am sorry I am not willing to cause any further damage to your hair.  I am in the business of doing healthy haircolor and no further chemical services can be done to your hair at this point and explain what can be done at this point......cuts, maybe conditioner, demi toner, at home maintenance at let them choose if I am for them.  If I am not the professional for them, they are free to leave and seek someone else.  I have no problem with this.  You can and probably will be sued.  It is not like the days of the past.  It is sad, but we live in a sue happy society.  You are a professional, and clients are coming to you hoping for the best - expecting the best case scenario even if you lay out the worst.  Even in corrective situations.  Even a release form does not help you.  In their mind, they still expect the best.  I don't care how many times you verbally go over it with them.  I am more of a colorist so I speak in color terms here so you can roll it over to any chem service that might cause more damage - but when speak of breakage I say NO WAY touch the hair!  It is more than that - it is your reputation.  I realized a long time ago, being good at what you do is not being able to produce what they wanted no matter what, it is being able to know you limits of your products.  Think about that one.  Again this is only advice.  You can be sued.........and this business is about ethics and laying our head down on our pillow at night and feeling good about our days work.  Much success to everyone.

Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator

www.behindthechair.com



keiferkat
Posts: 252
Bronze Member

Rude clients
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2006 6:23:20 AM
Today A lady waiked in with two kids.  She wanted her three year old boy to get a haircut.  It took about ten minutes to get him in my chair.  He kept jumping out and running away.  He actually did pretty good once we got him settled in.  I got started on his hair and she saw my sign and asked if kids hair cuts were 15.00.  I said yes they are for boys.  She gets on her cell phone and loudly tells her husband that our prices are outragous and the beauty school charges 2 dollars. (They actually charge 5).  She goes on and on saying that she thought for a kid it should be 5.00.  I finish the cut and she argues with me at the front desk.  She said boy you guys make a great wage, real sarcastically.  I said school costs 10,000 dollars now.  I told her there were barber shops in town that charge less.  I have a two by three foot price sign by the desk and she could have asked before I started.  She was driving a very expensive new suv.  and her kid had on designer clothes.  Some clients think we do this for a hobby.

CopaGirl
Posts: 210
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2006 9:35:30 AM
WOW! That's exactly why I don't do kids hair. (except at full price $48) The kids are a nightmare and the parents don't want to pay. Not worth the trouble. I don't even want to cut my own son's hair! (he's 4 1/2) That lady probably spends more at Starbucks on a daily basis!

glamgirl
Posts: 21

Posted: Saturday, April 01, 2006 8:41:07 AM
I worked in a salon in Palo Alto,CA during the dotcom boom and our prices were by how much time waas booked. My haircuts were $65 no matter who or how old you were. I had people bringing in their 3 year olds, wiggling all over. When they started wiggling, I was done. Not going to risk an accident with sharp scissors on a moving object. And they paid at the front desk. We booked a cut for 1 hour, or 3/4 hour, you pay for that time whether you use it all or not. Kinda cool. Or like you said, go to the barber...
glamgirl

felicia
Posts: 3

What do I do?
Posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2006 7:32:01 AM
I need some advice. What do you do whan they just don't show,  or when they cancel at the last minute? I mean big appointments.  Do you send them a bill? Hit them with a service charge?  I try to be very accomodating to my clients, and I think that's my problem.  They think I've got nothing better to do but serve them, and it's no big deal if they stiff me.  How do I nicely let them know the next time they have to pay?  I have it on the bottom of my menu.  Do I just go ahead and put it on their next bill?


pinkparagon
Posts: 187
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2006 9:37:51 AM
Felicia, this is a problem we all face, and there really is no way to force a client to pay when they don't show up, even if we have a policy stating otherwise. If you try to charge them for it "next time", be advised that they may opt to just go somewhere else. You have to decide if this person is a client you want to keep. I call my clients the day before, as a courtesy, to remind them of their appointment. Sometimes I still get no shows, or last minute cancellations, but the reminder calls help. I do understand that people have emergencies, illnesses, or sometimes forget, even with the reminder, and if it is a good client otherwise, I don't make too big a deal of it. The ones who are habitual no shows, show up late, move around my schedule a bunch of times at the last minute, I try to talk to them about it, usually something like this, " I have a problem and I hope you can help me find a solution for it. I make my living by selling my time, and when I have a client who (choose whatever applies) habitually does not show up, runs late, cancels at the last minute, etc., it keeps me from selling that time to someone else and it is costing me my livelihood. I value you as a person and as a client. Do you have any suggestions that will help us to work this out so that I can continue to take care of your hair?"

Sometimes people are not deliberately being rude, they are just ignorant, and if you make them aware of the problem, they change their behavior. Other times, they are just inconsiderate jerks.

I had a day a few weeks ago, in which I had 2 separate 3 hour services scheduled, one for a straightener, the other for a perm. Both had very long, thick hair and they both are well aware that I have to schedule extra time for them. I have gone above and beyond for both of these clients in the past. The first one, who, BTW, is a former hairdresser and salon owner, who is certainly aware of how things work, called at 15 minutes past her scheduled appointment time with the lame excuse that she couldn't make it, because she got, "called in to work" I wanted to say, 'yeah, so did I, by you, only I won't get paid!" So I called the other one to see if she could come in early, and she sounded terrible. Turns out she had had surgery several days prior, which she had neglected to mention when I called to remind her of her appointment. So, she was planning to no show as well. I was royally ticked off at losing 6 hours of appointment time, too late to sell it to anyone else. GRRRRRR!



Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, July 05, 2006 3:19:40 PM
I think it depends on how much you need thier
business in the future. I have a 3 strikes and you're out policy. I don't actually tell them I won't take them but I make it very difficult for them to get an appointment time that is desireable for them. I'd rather not have clients that do that to me as do we all. Luckily I work in a family chain salon which takes walk-ins and we are also allowed to book appointments. If someone does not show I always have plenty of walk-in's to take their place which is very nice. I do have clients who make appointments and do not show but it's rare because our salon is very busy and it's hard to get an appointment with me since I only work 18-20 hours a week. My regular clients know how hard it is to get an appointment with me again because if they show up late I usually have someone else in the chair thanks to those walk-in's. Then they have to either wait, come back or ask for any available stylist and they don't like that at all.
Before I became a stylist I had a girl who did my hair and was busy all of the time. I've seen her leave people in tears by basically firing them as clients. She could afford to do this since she was in great demand. You have to assess your own situation and figure out if you want to put up with that nonsense or not.
Taya

pepgirl
Posts: 2

need some lifting up
Posted: Friday, July 21, 2006 5:42:27 AM
I know every one has one of those days... But, what if you had a gut feeling you shouldn't have worked on the client at all.... I knew this would happen. For the first time, I actually had someone cry in my chair. A 50 year old woman. She is an extended family member to several of my clients. I had given her a deep condition and decided I did not care for attitude at all. So she calls me and wants to get her color done. I live in a smallish town and she usually goes 4 hours away to get her hair done. She comes in platinum (with roots) and wants a double process. Doesn't have the formula for me and doesn't know what she wants, JUST DO IT. So I do the base, and give her hightlights. She is too blond. CONFUSION, SHE IS PLATINUM. Starts crying, I said, "no problem, don't worry, I will put some dark blonde low lights." Do that, still freaks out. Cries. I don't charge her, I just want her out. After she leaves, other stylists and their clients try to console me because they didn't like her either. You know the type, lots of money, not happy with themselves. Everyone thought the color looked fine. So needless to say, I was up half the night worrying about her and if she is going to bad mouth me all over town. First time crier, I wanted to quit doing hair forever. Ugh. Thanks for letting me vent.


Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

PEPGIRL
Posted: Friday, July 21, 2006 11:40:04 AM
Pa-lease, do not shed one tear over that woman. She probably does the same thing to her nail person, her facialist, her clothing salespeople and everyone she meets. She is one of those fussy, miserable people who wants to be young again and nothing she does will take her back to her 20's. I love what HAIRMAVEN says in his videos. He says; "sometimes you're a hero, sometimes you're a goat"! I love that because when I heard him say that during a hair-cut in his DVD it took so much pressure off of me (and Hairmaven can cut some hair). Not everything we do is going to 100% please everyone. Hair is art. If you put a picture of a flower in a room full of artists and tell them all to paint that flower, every single painting will look completely different. It's the same thing with hair. You are an artist and your art reflects what you think she wants and what your education and experience have taught you. In her mind she wants to look like some movie star or someone she can never look like. I'm sure her hair was lovely and you did everything right. It is her problem. She is a miserable, rich woman who needs to get a life.
Don't fret honey. It's all going to work out. It's one client in 100's. Pick yourself up and go on. I do know how you feel. One disgruntled customer can make you want to hang up your shears forever. Just don't forget how many clients you do please and keep coming back to you. It's only life, it's temporary and don't worry over things that aren't fatal.
Chin up sweetie!
Taya

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

pepgirl
Posted: Friday, July 21, 2006 5:03:29 PM

Dear pepgirl-

Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  Listen, we all have these days.   You are correct there are always people we get a bad feeling about, and sometimes you just have to draw the line.  Everything happens for a reason.  It is a learning experience to make you grow stronger.  If you ever feel uncomfortable during a consultation and you do not feel as if you are on the same page as you customer - try asking this question:  what do you think I could do that you other colorist have not been able to do to make you happy?  Put the ball in their court.  When they have listed a list of some of the best colorist it is usually a sign that it is internal.  It is completely acceptable to tell the client I think you color is beautiful I would not change a thing.  Do not feel pressured.  Please do not beat yourself up over this.  Lay your head down in peace.........knowing that you have learned something so great and the next time you will approach the situation differently.  It is ok sometimes to say I do not think we are a great match.  And don't you worry, we will all have days like this throughout our career.  Don't you give up.  Chin up :)

Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



hairchic
Posts: 355
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, July 22, 2006 8:05:01 AM
I agree whole heartedly!!! There've been many a client I've said "d**m" I wish I wasn't so broke I could send them on their merry way - I muddled through and later realized how much I really learned from each sleepless night.

I finally realized there's no money worth my dignity.

FYI- funny story had a woman who took me over 45 minutes to simply BOOK her appointment she kept going on and on about her hair, former stylists, dr's appts etc.. ON THE PHONE no less
Once I FINALLY got a date and time out of her (she was my only appt that day) at 15 after the time I called her home her hubby knew nothing... got her on her cell wherein she accidentally answered without her knowledge and was talking to her "HUSBAND" (who knew nothing) when she realized what happened her lame excuse was she was at the dr's and THEY wouldn't let her talk or come to her appt!!! I politely asked her to NOT CALL BACK EVER! She in turn (minutes later) called the salon and spoke with the desk mgr for over 10 minutes ranting (but the dr wouldn't let her ?*? ) wherein the desk mgr handed the phone off to another stylist to listen then another (the woman was clueless) and simply hung up. I found out later she is a TOWN issue and NO ONE will do her :-)

SO chin up what goes around comes around.

pepgirl
Posts: 2

thanks
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2006 12:36:36 PM
Thanks guys. I appreciate it.

Hairchic, I know what you mean. If I had all the money and clients in the world... I would have sent her on her way. Unfortunately, it's feast or famine in this game. But if I have that situation comes around again, I will eat spaghetti and ketchsup if I have to.


AlenaL
Posts: 153
Bronze Member

mean old ladies! hahah
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2006 7:42:39 PM
Ya'll gave her such great advice! Taya you even made me feel better and I wasn't even upset! haha!  Oh, I had a total crab the other day, too. She is the owners clients, but told her she wasn't coming back because she let someone else get in the chair while she was standing up spraying her hair a gazillion times. She wasn't "FINISHED."  Haha, one of those ladies...so anyways... my boss goes out of town and she calls me up to do her hair. So I took her on, and she had me so frustrated by the end of her appointment I handed her the comb and said, "Okay Gorgeous...you perfect it now, since nothing I do is going to please you! You know how it is, nothing looks great until you get your own hands in it!" I hated to be so nasty/nice but at least I was nicer than her!  My favorite thing she said to me that day: So, how much do you charge for a roller set?  I said, "17 dollars." She said, " 14."  I said, "Excuse, me?" She goes, " We old women are on fixed budgets you know, and Donna only charges me 14."  I said, "Well wouldn't you know it, 21 year old newlyweds are on fixed budgets, too!! And you know I like to eat my supper, Mrs. Mary- And by the way, Donna runs this place but I'm a booth renter and I make my own prices so it's 17 today and everyday."  That shut her up! Ya'll have no clue how sickening she is, but she hasn't come back to either of us and we could really care less. Aren't we all better off without the meanies? :)

Jody
Posts: 8

hair breakage
Posted: Tuesday, July 25, 2006 7:01:15 AM

schwartzkopf color ? have you used it



kashairdresser
Posts: 4

Help
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 5:35:38 PM
I have been a salon owner for 3 years in the salon i have worked in since i was 14. I'm now 24 married and a new mom, running this business is the last thing i feel like doing when i can't find any staff. My shop is small but fun every one i hire turns out to be on coke or on the bottle. I just don't feel like there is any one out there that want's to work.... 3 years and i'm ready to sell. But who would buy a shop with 6 chairs a bad lease and two girls one 34 a single mom and the other 53 and ready to retire???????
Kate A Dupre

Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Kashairdresser
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 6:57:25 PM
It is sad that you can not find reliable hairdressers for your shop. I don't understand why you said you have a "bad lease". What does that mean? If you have issues like that your best bet will be to liquidate everything (hello Ebay) and close the shop. I had to close my antiques store in that way. Sometime's you have to cut your losses and move on.
Taya

Scottish Lassie
Posts: 71

Bad Lease?
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 7:19:40 PM

I agree, what exactly does that mean?

I would try to sell before I liquidate.  After all is said, YOU bought it and thought it would work.  What about the other two, were they even offered to buy the business before you?  Is the 53 year old retiring because she's made enough money, or is she just tired of doing hair?  Is it making any money now?  Is there a good environment outside your shop, locally?

If you look at this with fresh thoughts you may find out the real problem that is causing your despair!



lennychka
Posts: 2

stay or sell
Posted: Wednesday, September 06, 2006 6:38:37 PM
How much do you love this biz?  Do you want to start fresh?  Look at what your vision is and what you have now.  Is there a difference?  What has to happen to have your dream salon?  Get rid of the DEAD WOOD an begin at the creation.  Don't sway from your dream.  


hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

lennychka
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2006 4:41:34 PM

Dear lennychka -


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  We look forward to your continued support.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



kashairdresser
Posts: 4

Here is the rest of the story
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 6:40:04 PM

When I said bad lease I meant it's up in 2008, costing 1/4 of what i bring in a month gross, with 2 sinks not being able to be used at the same time, no updating on plumbing or alike in 20 years. The other two girls (the 53) year old doesn't want to own she likes to work 3 days a week and take what she can, the other is a single mom with NO $ or respect for herself or others or her image or reputation. The business is worth what i payed but has not done wellin the last year due to adopting a 5 year old child and getting married. It boils down to if i don't put in 55 hours behind the chair and 20 at the desk the business doesn't make enough to pay the bills. As far as new Employess I can't get a school to let me in the door to do a class or anything to meet budding stylists. And like i said the newspaper and other adds at the beauty supply and school get me people with drug problems. I just can't find anyone who want's to work ina small soalon. I really am a great boss- Education you got it- Time off if you need it, A ride to work, sure, want me to grab lunch ok.... What can i do to intise stylists where are they???

As far as a dream Salon, I just wanted to survive above average and give women a good place to work and raise a family, and my clients a fun place to get their hair done with some one they would want to hang out with while also looking and feeling their best. I have my dream I just need two more girls so it pays the bills the clients are there i just need the stylists, and the area is changing, it is going mostly to the mexican imigrants slowly but it is still on the way. We have a lot of great mom's, teachers, women in the work place and all of that even a few dads we are located near a local and very large hospital and we are convient and affordable. I am 5 min from home, I kind of pick my own hours. I guess what i need to know is if i can cut my over head- by getting a smaller and better place only 2 miles away do you think I would have a better chance of attracting new stylist and clients, What do stylist want in a salon?  What other advice do you have?



Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 3:33:12 AM
It is very hard to find decent stylists in this business. Even when you do you have to deal with family problems, changes in schedules, moves and the like. My dream salon would be this:

*A manager/owner who works with people as best she can on scheduling, dress code, etc. I would love to wear jeans to work, not ripped up jeans but nice clean jeans and I can't. I am most comfortable in jeans and trendy clothing but my salon will not allow it in any way.

*Rules...there has to be rules to keep things running smoothly. If there are no rules with repercussions for breaking them the place falls apart.

*Business building - not only on the part of the stylist but the part of the manager/owner. This means active ads and specials running in the paper all of the time. Advertising is important though expensive I know. Marketing is extremely important in this business because of all of the competition.

*A clean, attractive, updated salon. I hate it when everything is broken or not working correctly.

*A fully stocked color bar - at all times.

*Several lines of retail available to sell to my clients.

*Stylists who have ethics and you enjoy working with.

*Education, education, education. I love it when a salon offers all types of education.

I'm sure I could think of a hundred other things.
I know my dreams above are a very hard task to achieve given the quality of stylists that are out there. I can tell you one thing...your posts would make me think twice about opening a salon. I'd rather make some changes to my home to meet board approval and open a one girl salon in my home. Then you don't have to deal with the nonsense.
Taya

kashairdresser
Posts: 4

Good Call on the satying home part
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 7:04:39 AM
my question to you would be what kind of enforments to fallow up ruls, I have one girl who wears riped jeans in the salon when i don't allow jean... She is there on her day off to do clients she had cancled from days before due to personal issues which happen ona bi weekly basis. I asked to speak to her and she started yelling at me about how dare i say anything about her taking time off when she doesn't take a vacation and how she coninued to work even though she was having a mis carriage!!! I don't know how we got there when i just wanted to talk about the way she was representing herself in my salon. And she said she was done talking and that was it I left i'm not going to be yelled at and then dissmised aferter she has said her peace. So the next dat i asked her to find the time to talk to me and she said that she wasn't speaking to me and that was it. She has been a ghost in the salon since. And yesterday she came in the same jeanes on the same day off and acted like we were best friends. So maybe you can tell me where i went wrong and how to get a leash on her????

vallygrrl
Posts: 1280
Platinum Member

Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 10:20:58 AM
I can tell you as an employee (and this is already a biased oppinion, meaning as an employee I would ususally jump to the employees side)  that you seem to from what you have said to be doing nothing wrong.  I don't know where stylists luck out finding salon owners like you, because if I pulled half of that stuff at any of the salons I worked at I would be fired.  You seem like a very nice person and I think maybe she is playing on that.

Tayalynn
Posts: 147
Bronze Member

Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 1:31:50 PM
I think that perhaps you are more worried about keeping that stylist in there because you need the bills paid. She knows it and is playing you. She should have been kicked to the curb long ago. Sometimes when you have employees like that it will affect who wants to come to work for you. If you want to keep the bad ones on don't expect the good ones to stick around. In my salon we getting written up for breaking rules. It is a formal letter that is discussed with the employee. The employee signs it and the manager signs it. If the employee refuses to sign it she is immediately terminated. Not signing the warning means that employee has every intention of breaking that same rule that she/he was written up for in the first place. There is no need to keep them on for one more minute. There are six magic works for people like your employee:

YOUR SERVICES ARE NO LONGER NEEDED, GOODBYE.

Get rid of your weakest links. Once there is bad blood the morale of the saloon is ruined and it causes other problems as well such as stealing to get even, bad mouthing your business and making it difficult for other stylists to stay on.

You are the Owner. Get rid of her and start advertising for some stylists. Don't forget, it's pretty inexpensive to run an ad right here in the "Salon Jobs" section at Behind The Chair.

Taya

doinghairagain
Posts: 49

Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 3:15:06 PM

When she shows up with improper attire, send her home to change immediately. Tell her clients she will be back soon, she is running late. Let her mistakes reflect on her , not the salon. if she yells at you, she is fired.

I agree about fully stocked color. product lines can be few but complete. There should be staff meetings to boost morale and coach about duties and behavior. Education is important. Even if you can only afford a video and work together on manniquins at the meetings. stay excited about hair and beauty.

Take your place as manager. don't try to be friends. Praise good work publicly, and discuss problems in private in a timely manner.

We all are lucky to be part of this exciting field. Sometimes stylists forget that. A suggestion box is good to let them share their ideas about improving the salon.

Good luck. You can do it.



Scottish Lassie
Posts: 71

Absolutely Right!
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2006 6:50:16 PM

I agree, take your position back and let her know you've seen enough, heard enough and this is the final straw, do it right; or break it and LEAVE!

Her clients, and others too, probably feel the tension there between you two.  It's not worth having someone wreck your career for her pleasure!  This is your living too!!!  I agree with doinghairagain...Be a manager to her, not a friend.

She will not like it at first but you have to lay down the rules and enforce them, for the sake of your other staff too.

Maybe then you can have some peace in your head/heart/life too!



TracyG
Posts: 2

I'd like to vent too!
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 7:54:16 PM
Hi, im new here! I just wanted to vent about a reoccuring problem I've had. I attended a vocational school, received my cosmetology license from there, interned under a wonderful stylist, and am now working in a salon that has mostly older women as clients...thats not my complaint, I'm only 17 (18 in a month!) but have been working in this field since I was 14 working as a receptionist, then an intern. I feel very confident in most of my abilities especially styling, but I have MANY clients refused to come to me because of my age, and because I attended a vocational school instead of a "real beauty school". I'm getting sooo frustrated because I know I could do a good job if they just gave me a chance...What can I do to make them trust me? I thought that hopefully the clients who had allowed me to do their hair and are returning customers would help, but it hasnt seemed to...I just dont know what to do, I feel like giving up on this field already! Should I switch to a salon with a younger clientel?

teachhair
Posts: 60

Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 9:44:38 PM

Being as young as you are in a salon of older women is certainly a challange.  You might ask the owner if you could give away some services just to get your work out there.  Hand out cards at a local shopping center with a free service offered.  I know of a young lady that did this for one week and had 90% of the people return.  If you want to do chemical services offer to pay for the product.  The more people you can do the more your work will be seen and then the cliental grows.


As far as the vocatioal school vs beauty school is concerned I believe you have recieved a better complete education than most beauty school grads.  At least for the programs I know about around here the vocational training is superior.


 


Keep pushing and you will suceed



BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, June 15, 2007 6:56:13 AM
TracyG ...

First of all, where you went to "school" means nothing!  I wouldn't even bring the subject up.  Let me ask you a question ... do you know which medical school your doctor went to???  And believe me ... THAT means much more.

Beauty school is not where you learn how to be a great hairdresser.  Your experince as an "intern" (I hope you mean assistant) is where you should have received much of your hairdressing foundation.

If you are really young looking, perhaps the salon you are in, at this time, is not your best placement ... especially if you want to do fashion hairdressing. BUT, I feel that most clients only care about how good their hair looks, after you do it ... not how old their styist is.  In fact, I'd think it would have the opposite effect. SO ... if you can do great hair, I'd think your age shoud not be an issue, at all.

What does your manager think about your question?

Big question: Why didn't you move into a stylist postion, at the salon you assisted??  That would have seemed natural to me.  In fact, that is my advice to young hairdressers ... assist in the salon you want to work.  It is conter-productive to do it otherwise.

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

TracyG
Posted: Saturday, June 16, 2007 11:48:16 AM

Dear TracyG


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  Nice to have you with us.  Where are you from?


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



TracyG
Posts: 2

thanks
Posted: Saturday, June 16, 2007 6:47:27 PM
Thanks for all of the advice,

The reason I didnt become a stylist at the place I interned (which is the name by beauty school gave the program) is because the salon was only booth rental, and I was just starting out the no clients, not a lot of my own supplies, and no money, so I needed to go someone that had commission.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Saturday, June 16, 2007 9:36:53 PM

TracyG ...

Good answer ... I hadn't thought of that as a reason, since, in my opinion, salons that do only booth renting, are poor places to assist.  Ideally, you should "put you time" into a salon where the exposure can help yo ustart your clientelle.  I think every salon owner, should have the option of commission, so a young stylist can get going.



valley31
Posts: 1

wasted time!
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2007 9:53:19 AM
i had an ok day before one client came in as a walk-in. this is a regular client they knows everyone and sometimes try to get a free hair do! anyways she chose me to ask, i said yes but i do have scheduled client coming in so i will be working with her in between time clients. ok she said. i started her hair along with my sch. clients. in the mist of all this she started to do the most annoying and crude thing, talk about the stylist, in the salon, to other stylist. wow that just did it for me. not knowing what was said, i finished her hair, everything was "good, great, its ok, i like it," so she paid me and she left. now usually when there's a holiday you're not working or receiving phone calls, well she called me complaining. she said she didn't like her hair all of her pen curls came out, her bang was too poofy and she wants her money back. i was angry at this point, not letting her know, i said i would give her back the money. i know i made a quick decision but because she is known in the salon as "miss i d k what i want" i made that decision. so out of all that was said did i make the wrong decision by letting her sit in my chair?

russnyc
Posts: 1146
Platinum Member

Flag this client
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2007 6:11:49 PM
If you have a computer system, FLAG this client that she is to see no one but her preferred stylist. She is working the system, but chalk this up as a lesson learned. Your owner should revisit refund policies for styling and updo services, a comment such as

I'm sorry but we no longer offer cash refunds for styling services, if you have any further complaints, please ask the manager and we would gladly restyle your hair at no charge the SAME DAY before you leave the salon. If it is a local law, you must post this policy near the reception area as well or make sure it says NO REFUNDS on the bottom of the credit card receipt.

You can't run a business this way, but it is the rarest of clients that try to get away with it. Be firm but buffer it with, "We really appreciate your business and will try to do right by you by only booking you with your preferred stylist from now on." If she is complaining about her regular stylist, you need to kick her to the curb and tell her to find another salon that can do what she wants.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, November 23, 2007 10:38:15 PM

Right on, russnyc!

Life is TOO SHORT to fight this type battle.  Plenty of good clients out there!



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

valley31
Posted: Monday, November 26, 2007 9:59:02 PM

Dear valley31


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  Nice to have you with us.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



valley22
Posts: 1

thanks (name changed from valley31)
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2007 7:13:18 PM
im new to the business so i really try to please my clients. lately business has been slow for me but thats ok i think i need to move on anyways because of how the salon is ran (not by the salon mrg) but by the other stylist that can't do no wrong.

its time for bigger and better businesses to look into!!!!

well thanks for having me. if there is a place or someone that i could talk too this would be it!

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

valley22
Posted: Tuesday, December 04, 2007 7:55:29 AM
Dear












valley22

Before you leave this business completely, have you considered just changing salons.  Why don't you discuss your issues a little more and we will try and give you some advice.  I am sorry you are having trouble.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



da_luckiest_one
Posts: 88

sometimes i get so frusterated!
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2007 8:09:53 PM

Today was just an awful day for me. It all started out with this guy who told me he wanted a bald fade but actually meant a high & tight. He went to another shop to get it fixed and the manager of that shop who is a complete jerk called to say I did very bad hair. Because of my lack of experience, I tend to think that a bald fade and a high & tight are 2 different haircuts. Please correct me if i'm wrong. What made the whole situation bad was that 2 of the ladies I work with said I should have asked them if I needed their help. I know I haven't been out of beauty school for long but really, how hard is it to do a bald fade when that's what they ask for?



barbergirl
Posts: 4

bald fade
Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2007 2:47:17 PM

There is a big difference between a bald fade and a high and tight. The problem I find is that it seems to depend if they go to a barber or a hairdresser.  They were started by military, so by military standards and barberstylists, a bald fade is a zero blade on the bottom and sides that slowly works up.   A high and tight is a zero - 1 blade straight up the sides to the temple. 


It seems alot of hairdressers are using a #3 up the sides and calling this a fade. IT IS NOT!  If you are unsure of any cut, you should always ask the client to explain in detail what he wants.


It's a lesson learned. Don't sweat it.



Tapers
Posts: 54

Bald Fade
Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2007 9:19:57 PM

Hello barbergirl!

Great explaination of the differences between cuts on guys - SO tough to learn - when a millimeter makes a huge mistake if in the wrong place, or looks unfinished!  Most military men will tell you exactly WHAT THEY NEED, if they are getting a haircut for a reason - I might add that this is the same with all types of hair: straight/overcurly/asian.  Ask them what they want and repeat it back to them, and then cut...you only get one chance, as you've learned  - 

da_luckiest_one, I feel your pain! 

We have all had bad experiences, move on and learn from it, and ignore the phone call, a real professional helps you, not slams you!



salowner
Posts: 5

Holidays
Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2007 8:47:58 PM
Is anyone else experiencing a slow Holiday season?  We have always had huge retail, gift cert, and bookings, however, this year is not good.  Is it just the South or is everyone having this kind of season?

Smile
Posts: 6

it is slow
Posted: Thursday, December 13, 2007 7:15:11 PM
I'm in PA and yes it has been slow. Slower than normal and much slower than December should be.

salowner
Posts: 5

Slow Christmas
Posted: Thursday, December 13, 2007 8:36:45 PM

Thanks for responding.  I guess it is the economy.  We are one of the busiest salons in town and this whole quarter cannot compare to last year.  Hopefully 2008 will be better.  All we can  do is hang in there and keep doing our best!  Good Luck to all!



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

salowner
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2007 7:55:09 AM

Dear salowner


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  Nice to have you with us.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



Kami121563
Posts: 12

Lost It
Posted: Thursday, March 13, 2008 11:00:53 PM

This is just my way of trying to get over my anxiety attack. I know everyone has bad days... have had them myself, but what about one that lasts for a couple weeks.   I am the owner of a newer salon, I work hard and have been doing hair for 23 years. All of a sudden everything I do is wrong !  the straw that broke the back..... a color, nothing like she wanted, I was totally lost. Yes alot going on but no excuse, I can't seem to shake this one . The feeling of dreed, knowing someone is out there probly getting it  fixed ( since there was no call yet). I am mortified and even took the night off.   I just feel so stressed, if it's not hard enough making it in this economy this is all I need.   How do you out there that own salons and work 50 - 60 hrs. week do it.  I don't have the money yet to pay for a manager so I do all of it and am having a hard time switching hats around. I don't know some days I feel like I'm going to beak.



Well Thanks for listening BTC I'll stop boering everyone and continue my panic attack.



 



russnyc
Posts: 1146
Platinum Member

Kami
Posted: Friday, March 14, 2008 7:13:05 AM
Hi Kami

It's very important you move on and "forgive yourself".

The toughest thing is when you've made a mistake and it isn't fixed within you realm. Build out a staff that will share and a team that cares so that if you ever have a run in like this again you have a resource to draw upon.

I also find that once you've done hair long enough, the only way you make a mistake is if you are rushed or have too much on your mind.

When you foresee challenges with time or are distracted, go right to your book and blot out several fifteen minute increments or train your receptionist to quickly recognize when you have fallen behind and not to book conflicting or overly tight appoinments.

Half of undoing a mistake is learning from it and moving on.

The other half is to forgive yourself.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, March 14, 2008 9:45:45 AM
Right on, Russ!

Another suggestion that I learned after too many years of cramming my schedule as full as possible ... for almost ten years now, I book a full hour for "lunch".  I use it for catching up; easing the pressure of a busy morning; taking care of a hair emergency; doing a favor for a good client ... OR ... actually having a lunch break (great for the mind!)

Put it behind you ... learn from it ... go forward. :-D

Kami121563
Posts: 12

Posted: Friday, March 14, 2008 7:34:30 PM
Thank You for your support, I'm starting to calm down. I  am  gong to try the tips also. I know I'm kinda a control freak , I'm sure that doesn't help.  I just never understand why it's so hard to forgive youself. Well thanks again and I hope I can lend my support where needed.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Saturday, March 15, 2008 9:28:26 AM
Kami ... Have you heard the Serenity Prayer?

"Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom  to know the difference".

Life throws many challenges our way ... some we have little control over, and others are completely within our ability to handle.  Be at peace with yourself ... flow with the ups & downs.  You'll find that the better you get at this, the more often good things happen.

davidc
Posts: 2

A Rainbow After The Storms!!!
Posted: Sunday, April 20, 2008 3:33:55 PM

Guys, I know this is the place to come and let your hair down and rant about all the bad things that happen in our career, but I wanted to offer some hope. Maybe a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Lord knows I have had my ups and downs over the past 15 years behind the chair of the salon, but for every obstacle there has always been a rainbow. (Geez I sound like Pollyanna) But hang in there and all your dreams will come true. I began in beauty school with nothing in my imagination but finished with the world in my sights. I remember hitching a ride to beauty school each day for a year with this woman that I did not even much like to be with. She drove an ugly old out-of-date car, had a loud screeching voice and looked like a drag queen (a really ugly one cause I know some pretty ones)


I made it through and over a dozen or so years later I have owned two successful salons, written editorial columns in magazines, newspapers, hosted my own live radio show, taught a lecture series at a nearby college and most recently launched a FABULOUS FASHION MAGAZINE.


www.beautifulmagazine.org for details.


So, vent if it helps!!! Then, get back on the horse. I am no different than any of you. Like Tim Gunn on Project Runway says all the time..."Just Make It Work!!!"



Best of luck to you all!!!!



color4U
Posts: 31

clients and directions!
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2008 9:55:30 PM
I an getting annoyed with some of my clients and new ones I am having the hardest time grasping the idea of why is it so freaking hard to take care of your hair! It's amazing to me that its that hard or taken so lightly i mean it isnt the end of the world when you have a bad hair day or you have split ends but like I had one kid today. Young man I would say early 20 if that. He has the worst dandrift I have seen in my life ( im only 22 but it was bad) it was chunks of scalp, it really was nasty and his hair was oily and greasy and unwashed. First his little girlfriend or whom ever she is didn't want me to wash it thinking it was going to cost more until i informed her its complimentary. well i was explaining to him some products that would help, he was like well i tried Tea Tree and i didn't like it I said on well what about it didn't you like so I can get a better idea of you are looking for out of your shampoo he told me he didn't remember he tired it when he was 17 lol/ i was like ok well maybe he's just embarrassed about it so i told him well everything in the salon is on sale and its a great time to get something or switch. he told me well its up to her so i don't know. I understand when money is tight you don't worry about products but I had the throw my comb out because it was all stuck in it. I felt bad for him but seriously if its that bad wouldn't you want to do something about it or is it just me? I don't know I wasn't mean about it or loud or anything that would make it known to anyone else in the salon.

I have another lady who is a level 2 natural and gets color and highlights, the newgroth is pretty much a 7cb and she wants her highlights to be a 10. Well when she came to me u can imagine the condition of her hair. but by the time she left it was like 10 times better with treatments and color and all that good stuff. Well she came back for me to re lift her I told her I would because I didnt lift her as light at she wanted and I told her this when she left I told her that if you decide you do want to go lighter you have one week to come back but you have to consider the condition of your hair that last stylist didn't and she knew it and didn't care to much. But I have her using a protein and a condition treatment at home she came back and told her how much she used I about lost it lol. almost half the bottle, I told her how to use them (AGAIN) and gave her a better visual this time. mind you she has hair to her butt, but it isn't that thick due to breakage and what not. I gave her specific directions on when to wash condition and treat cuz normally she just does when ever so we will see how this works for her hopefully she does it cuz her hair could be really pretty if taken care of!! Well Im done venting thanks all!! I feel better!!

elumin
Posts: 3

hard times
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2008 2:53:00 PM
I'm having a really hard time with customers, just in general.  a few months ago I had a client who doesnt cut her hair often, colors it herself, does not want to go short or change at all, but yet wants a change? It took me 1hr and 30 minutes to figure this out. on top of everything else I wasnt feeling very well. In the end it turned out ok.

xxhairdivaxx
Posts: 102
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, July 31, 2008 11:16:59 AM

@Elumin


I feel your pain.  I hate customers like that and its hard to maintain your patience with people like her that are indecisive.  I have a customer like her and I've been doing her hair for over 10 years now and every experience is the same over and over again.  She sees a style in a magazine likes and wants it, but doesn't want her hair cut.  Well then that means you don't want that style.  Our consultations always last at least an hour or better.  I always tell her to buy the products that I prescribe for her, she doesn't do it.  I tell her how to take care of her hair at home and to wrap her hair up at night, she don't do it.  ONe time I got so fed up with her I tactfully inclined her to see another stylist, but she didn't do it.  She tells me all the time how she trusts me and I'm the only stylist that keeps her hair growing, but she drives me crazy!!!!!


It never fails.  I dread whenever she calls.  She pays well and tips beautifully, but damn it if she doesn't pull me through the fire each and every time.



Tapers
Posts: 54

Pain...
Posted: Thursday, July 31, 2008 7:06:01 PM

 

...and we all appreciate that YOU keep her as a client and we don't have her walk through OUR door...THANKS! 

Am I right readers?...