Discussion Board:
Bulletin Boards > A day in the life of.... > Arghhhh...Management!
Posted By:
Posted By:AliG on: 10/5/2006 12:09:55 PM


Display:
Author: Thread: Arghhhh...Management!
AliG
Posts: 31

Arghhhh...Management!
Posted: Thursday, October 05, 2006 12:09:55 PM

Anyone have solutions for dealing with challenging management?

I'm having trouble working under the manager of my salon. She gives a lot of negative feedback (not constructive) and rarely offers any positive.  She also works the 15 staff beyond what is reasonable (squeezes in several clients into one slot).   When she works there is a negative feel in the air and some of my coworkers are stressed out too.  Direct talking to her causes backlash and more negative feedback.  Does anyone have any creative ideas as to how to learn to tolerate the situation/change it?   



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

AliG
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2006 4:59:57 AM

Dear AliG-


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  I am sorry you are having difficulties at your salon.  How long have you been there?  I know it must be tough going to work with tension everyday.  How is the salon owner to talk to?


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



AliG
Posts: 31

Posted: Friday, October 06, 2006 10:42:49 PM

Thanks Hues4U, owner/manager are the same person.  I've been there 2 1/2 yrs and it seems to get progressively worse as time goes on.  You're right..I am super stressed out and often go home on the verge of tears. 



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

AliG
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2006 5:04:50 PM

Dear AliG-


That has got to be really hard feeling like that daily.  What will happen if you talk to her/him?  Just keep in mind that you have options, there are other salons out there. 


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



CJ
Posts: 66

Posted: Monday, October 16, 2006 11:14:41 AM
Does the owner/manager do hair?

It's totally unreasonable to expect stylists to do QUALITY work if they're overbooked. If this manager/owner wants the rep of the salon to remain good, it's in HER own best interest to ease up on the bookings, so that "her" staff can do great work.

Maybe she just hasn't thought about it that way. Better yet, do your own bookings, stating that you're doing it so that you have enough time to maintain quality control. Even better, would be to have other stylists do the same thing.

How about calling a staff meeting? Then you can "all" air your grievances, along with ideas for making things better.
http://www.skwij.ca >>-))o>

AliG
Posts: 31

Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2006 10:14:10 PM

Thanks for your responses.  Owner doesn't do hair anymore but used to so you'd think she'd have some understanding.  I agree quality work is important.  If I am commissioned though I cant really take over my bookings can i?

Good point that there are other places to work.  I guess my best bet is to figure out what this job is worth to me;.



digger66
Posts: 1

Want to buy Salon...
Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 4:01:26 PM
Does anyone have any tips on how to be good manager in this industry? What are the top 10 things managers do wrong? I have no background in Salon industry, but have run businesses before.

hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

digger66
Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 4:41:52 PM

Dear digger66


Welcome to the BTC Talk Back Boards!  Please take a few moments to read over the board rules in the green box above.  I am certain that our great members will have a response for you soon.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



AMirage
Posts: 402
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 5:52:34 PM

My list of the top ten things I have seen salon managers do wrong.

1) Loud aggresive confrontations are no way to get your point across, the behavior gets the attention opposed to the matter at hand. A calm attentive demeanor will help you find a solution to the problem. A manager should never fly off the handle and use fear control.

2) Showing up late is not a good role model. Showing up late repeatedly is even worse. Practice what you preach.

3) Never leave an appointment waiting for long periods of time without the smallest greeting.

4) Never bad mouth one stylist to another.

5) Never bad mouth the owner to the stylists.

6) Never bad mouth the owner and the stylists to the clients.

7) Life happens sometimes and things get delayed, never repeatedly leave your staff without the tools for their trade.

8) Do not undermine or discipline your staff in front of a client.

9) Never deal with a difficult client in front of other clients.

10) This is the best...... I've experienced this one. Never screw up the Bridal Book repeatedly. Oh that drove me nuts! OK thats my personal manager gripe lol.

I could go on.

AMirage



AMirage
Posts: 402
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 6:19:04 PM

All kidding aside....

http://www.spas2b.com/2b_successful.php?Article=3

I typed "Top Ten Salon Management Mistakes" into google. I would join several online communities, and maybe invest in some step by step programs for you to study. There are a few out there written by successful salon owners.

I wouldn't be surprised if you can find a book in reference to your needs in the BTC store, or click on the business link and read some of the articles.

Not brown nosing lol, I have looked these things up myself.

I would definitely get myself familiar with the rules and regulations regarding this industry. The health inspector can be a nice guy if you are prepared when he comes.

Just dive in, research, read about management woes, and management success articles. Learn it. Enjoy.

AMirage



russnyc
Posts: 1134
Platinum Member

React
Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 7:16:27 PM
The best way to handle your manager is to not react AT ALL when she pressures you at that moment, and to sort of let her THINK she's making the decisions when you are really the one who has control... (I will explain)

She will press you as far as she can until you break from what is sounds like, maybe she is under financial stress and really doesn't see what she is doing wrong with the book. She is stressing you because you guys let her. Then she senses this bad vibe as you, not her. THIS is why I say not to react at that moment. Either you or the highest billing stylist needs to do this meeting, but you need to do it right away.

Instead of lashing out or causing a scene, say on an overbooked saturday, try coming instead on monday or first thing in the morning or right after lunch. Tell her slightly ahead of the time (the same day) that you need to speak with her, make sure it is in an office NOT in the salon, desk, or in front of others. The tone should be casual, really try to find a time you know she will not be distracted.

You also can't gang up on her or mention anyones else's problems but your own. Wait to see how she handles it before telling others anything.

Start the conversation with many positive things, "I really like working here, I want to be here for awhile", but lay down the line for how much time you need for clients.

Tell her that clients have complained that they feel rushed to you, this isn't really lying because BEFORE THIS MEETING you have gone back and called all those squeezed clients and check to see that they were happy with their service (ask, "Did you feel rushed at all?" as one of the last questions). If you cannot contact them, ask the clients in your chair the same question or try to when they come in again.

Lay out a plan with her that you want to build your clientele, and an important part of that is raising the level of your work and building referrals. You yourself will lay out a callback program for all new clients to make sure they are happy by calling them back a week after they have visited. When finishing the call with the client, you also say something like, "Thank you so much for your business, if you can think of anybody who needs a good cut, please send them in! Thanks! (Mention this to her as part of your referral strategy)

With determination, tell her, "I want to build at least five referrals a week and I'm not going to do that by squeezing anybody in, they all need to have enough time on the book to get good service."

Also tell her that you will do this for about a month, monitor your success, then offer to show the other stylists how to do this. This way she can't say it will take too long or tie up the phones.

WAIT a few seconds in between each idea and see if she pipes in with her own input before continuing onto the next idea, but hold the conversation in your control until you have conveyed all of it.

Then again outline any other booking challenges you have and ASK HER OPINION on just how to fix them, and again close on a positive note, " I really want to build clientele at your salon, I want to make this happen, let's give it a chance".

The best way to speak to somebody like this is to show them you actually have a solid plan and reason underneath the chaos that will make money for them as an end result. When she sees that you have planned things out, she will give you leeway.
Really try to phrase the questions and have the plan fleshed out well enough so that she cannot say "no".

If she bursts out in anger or is negative about your plan, or shoots down everything you say, I would quit.


HAIRGEEK
Posts: 162
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, January 26, 2007 8:49:19 PM
Love reading all your responces Russnyc-always very positive & professional common cents, LOVE IT!

AMirage
Posts: 402
Silver Member

Posted: Saturday, January 27, 2007 6:20:15 AM

Great advice Russ as always.... it's a shame managers take it out on their staff. I agree 100 % with your ways of dealing with a difficult manager, I would love to share some of the tales of my x manager with you some day, she was something I've never dealt with before and hopefully never deal with again. I dealt with her pretty much as you suggest. I learned a lot from her mistakes as well.

This post became new on January 26th. Digger requested advice on managing a salon. They are interested in owning one and don't have a background in the industry to know as much as they would like to know.

I am unsure of the situation with the original poster of this thread. Would be nice to find out if they hung in there, or moved on.  Maybe they will get a notification in their email and come visit us.

AMirage

Sips her coffee.....

 



ljmeyer
Posts: 12

Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2007 1:59:48 AM

I have been an owner/stylist/manager for 9 years now, and 'just a stylist' for 22 years.  I do not claim to be the best of owner/managers by any means.  I do, however, try to be myself and deal with every situation as well as I possibly can.  My staff knows who I am and where I would like to be in 5 years.  I also know the same about them.  I try to take all of their concerns into consideration and act upon them when needed.  My staff knows that things aren't perfect in OUR salon but they stay because I acknowlege all of their concerns and try to make things better for them without compromising the salon itself.  So, my advice, as a learning owner, is to be true to you..........don't ever let others actions or visions get in the way of your own.  You obviously have a vision or you wouldn't open your own salon. 

In my salon, every stylist has different booking times.  It is all computerized.  If they need more time for specific clients we override the system and allow that extra time.  They also know what they are supposed to be bringing in on an hourly basis to make what they are used to making.  So if they have to adjust times, they adjust prices as well.

If you need to go to a salon with a compassionate manager..........please come and join us.  I do expect quality services and of course an example of your work prior to being hired.  We are in Alaska.........Anchorage to be exact.  If you feel like moving.....come and check us out!

Best of luck to you!



AliG
Posts: 31

Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2007 6:07:08 PM

thanks for the wonderful advice everyone.  I haven't logged on in a while as feeling very discouraged.  Haven't done anything about the situation as I'm still trying to work it out in my own head.  Did talk to other stylists I can trust and seems this is a problem for at least some others.....will keep you posted....now I have lots to think about.....



lindau
Posts: 10

management
Posted: Thursday, August 30, 2007 5:06:01 AM
Wow I have reading this and this brings back so many bad times!!!  I sooo feel for you and who ever works there.  I DID work for a salon like that for 2 years and it was shear he**!  You have to get out!!  Luckily where I am now, I am management now and the manager who I worked under who gave me all the crap you are going through made me the manager I am today.  Caring, a good listener, sympathetic and all of the above.  Good Luck to you and if you can get out!!!

AliG
Posts: 31

Posted: Saturday, September 08, 2007 10:07:16 PM

An update....so met with manager and spoke about having enough time for quality service and referral building.  Response was you need to speed up service and bookings are continued to come at me one after another.  Looking into other areas/opportunities for work.....we'll see! I'll keep you posted...



AliG
Posts: 31

update
Posted: Monday, February 25, 2008 12:20:49 AM

FINALLY, I'm out!  Long story short, nothing changed @ salon despite following all advice so finally I have made the decision to leave and feel a HUGE sigh of relief! 



brockvillesalon@live.com
Posts: 1

owner needs advice
Posted: Friday, November 27, 2009 9:11:54 AM