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Posted By:mare on: 6/21/2007 5:02:40 AM


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Author: Thread: Bosses, yikes!
mare
Posts: 4

Bosses, yikes!
Posted: Thursday, June 21, 2007 5:02:41 AM
Need advice on unprofessionalism and consideration.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Thursday, June 21, 2007 7:25:36 AM
We need more information, before much assistance can be offered. Disliking bosses is fairly common ... sometimes for good reason, but other times unjustifably.  I know in my salon, about a quarter of the staff don't really like how the owner runs the business.  They haven't left, but complain frequently.

mare
Posts: 4

Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2007 5:21:18 AM

I know, I was editing and had to leave for work. 


 The other day I was 15 min. late for a client that I did not know was on my book. She was put on Tuesday, we are closed. When I have 9 a.m. appts. I am there. I go above and beyond in the salon. My boss has called me before to let me know she gave me a 9 a.m. I am at work by 9:15 even if I do not have anyone on my book.  I have been at this salon for about 1 1/2 yrs. and in the industry for about 5. I am still building a clientele. I am 47 yrs. old, have a family and home. I hardly ever ask for time off other than vacation. A couple of weeks ago I asked if I could leave early, 4 p.m. on Friday because my nephew was graduating from high school and he wanted me and my husband to attend. She said it was o.k. but on Sat. morning I had to hear her grief. The episode the other day was done in front of clients! You could have cut the air with a knife. I apologized endlessly to my client. I have not said anything to my boss but I do plan to get my point across to her about consideration.


I have worked in two other salons, the first she rented from an idiot and lost her business the other the owner put the place up for sale and didn't tell me. My other employers appreciated my dedication and always told me I was a hard worker, which I am. They did not expect me to sit all day when the phone wasn't ringing or walk ins were not coming. This is a very small neighborhood salon. I stay and help the other stylist if the shampoo girl was not brought in that day, I keep the towels clean, sweep, and used to clean the brushes until Pat (the other stylist) told me not to.(bad grammar I know). Once again I have to leave for work. My question is, what is the norm in salons if one does not get paid hourly, as far as hours?  I do put in alot of hours. Thanks.



BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2007 8:18:03 AM

Certainly you are legally entitled to minimum wage for the hours you work.  Even if on commission ... as an employee (required to work certain hours), the least you can earn must figure out to minimum wage.  Beyond that, the owner can require you to work whatever hours are necessary (in their mind) to operate the salon.  By the way ... minumum wage allows for over-time ... even double-over time.

Be very clear with your owner ... are you expected to be in the salon, even if you have no clients booked, during the early morning, or late day hours.  In my opinion, a stylist who is buildibng a clientelle should work as many hours as possible (practically, of course), just in case there are last minute call-ins, or walkins.  When I was starting out, I was affraid to miss an opportunity.

I'll check back after I get back from work ... to add more, and make sure I understand your question. Have a great day!



mare
Posts: 4

Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2007 4:26:11 PM
Thanks, BRHair. I certainly agree that I should put in hours. I have taken walkins at 5 p.m. on Sat. when the salon was closing. Our hours are 9 a.m. Wed. thru Sat., Wed. and Fri. I stay at least till 6 p.m. and Thurs. and Sat. till at least 3 p.m. It all depends on clients. I have sat till 6 p.m. if that is what time a client wants.   As I said this is a very small salon, 2 stylists plus the owner. She is very "old school". She is not any different from the other two owners I worked for as far as advertising, either. None  of them thought is was necessary and I did and still do pay out of my pocket to advertise to get business to come.  Right now I am mailing post cards to addresses that are listed in the paper each iweek n the real estate section.  My first boss said she had a full book and didn't need to advertise, this one says our work is our advertisement. I agree but,  clients are needed to do hair. In our block there are six salons and one more possibly coming. My salon has been there the longest, over 40 years. I am just having a difficult time deciding if I have made the right decision. This is a dream come true for me. I have known I wanted to do hair since I was five, but I didn't have enough confidence when I was younger. If this salon doesn't work out I probably will leave the business, I don't have the time to start all over again elsewhere. A friend of mine suggested that keep a record of my hours plus the $ I put out for advertising to figure out what I earn hourly. I started tp do that this week. Thanks again.

pokepres
Posts: 81

mare
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2007 6:58:55 PM
if a problem as little as the ones youve encountered are enough to make you leave the business forever then, it doesn't sound like much of a dream job for you to have in the first place. maybe you should be rethinking your career, little things like that would never stop me from doing what i love

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2007 12:13:23 AM

To some extent I agree with pokepres ...

If this is your "dream come true", then you should FIGHT for it!!  Don't let anything get in the way of your accomplishing success.

There must be other opportunities in town ... other salons ... other stylist to mentor you.  There IS an answer.

Don't you dare give up ... make it happen.  You will live to regret it, if you walk away from hairdressing.



russnyc
Posts: 1138
Platinum Member

Negotiate
Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2007 5:19:51 PM
Hi

You sound like the model employee. When you need to take off early, always do it two weeks in advance unless it's an emergency, and start up with "You know, I didn't want to ask for the whole day off, but I need to-"

This is going to get them on your side before they have made a decision. I know people that take four days off for their birthday! LOL

The toughest challenge you have is that you're dependable! Any sort of radical change from that is going to sort of raise questions and friction, I've experienced this double standard before with owners that go out of their way for others but always cause problems for model employees because they think you'll upset the whole system.

In many ways you have to understand that it is setting a standard for others when a difficult decision is being made, a graduation to you is a big deal and something to enjoy. Just make sure you have plenty of advance notice.

I would definitely pull the owner into the office and stress to them you will not tolerate belittling behavior in front of customers, and you'd appreciate them waiting to take them in the office. Make sure you always heap on some praise first, like "I really like working here".



The best advertising is inside your own clientele, not cold mailing people, a lot of clients think this reeks of desperation, or worse think, "If she's such a good stylist, why the heck is she mailing me things?"Spend a bit of time talking to your clients about referring friends and develop little invitations with a discount or gift inside, you'll be surprised at what they say and think about you. I just had one say something like, "Oh, you're taking on more clients? I have tons of friends that need color!"

Geez, I'm thinking, she thinks I'm so busy I'm not taking any more clients! LOL

Sit down and map out a 40 hour work week with your boss, tell her you don't want to work any more than that (doesn't matter if she does, be FIRM YOU WON"T and are a good employee). Some bosses just don't understand that you need a good vacation and set schedule to make more money, not more hours.

If you get friction from trying to set a schedule, throw a good scare into her by hinting "I wonder if any of the other stylists across the way work as hard as I do?" It is FINE to toot your own horn when negotiating, and the worse thing you can EVER DO is underestimate yourself!

Humberto
Posts: 271
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, June 25, 2007 7:55:17 AM

All salons are unique and each stylist has their own style, however most clients will want consistency from the businesses they patronize.  If your salon opens at 9am I would be there at 8:15-8:30 each and every day whether I had a client or not.

Our salons are very strict on early arrival.  The first time a stylist comes in late, they are sent home for the day any clients they had that day are called and given the option to reschedule with their stylist or keep thier appointment but with another stylist.  The second time a stylists is late they are sent home for a week.  If they are late a third time they are terminated.  We suggest all employees come in at least a half hour before thier shift begins. 

My daughter worked at Bumble&Bumble in NY and one of the quotes she came back with was

"Early is on time, on time is late, and late is unacceptable."



BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, June 25, 2007 11:43:52 AM
Right on Humberto ...

It is always amazing to me, how so many unsuccessful stylists will complain about NOT being busy, but be willing to take advantage of not being booked, by taking time off.

mare ... manifest your enthusiasm for your career, by over-achieving.  Don't follow the norms of the salon ... set you own standards.  Pretend you are booked solid ... allow your actions to be those of a highly successful hairdresser.  Use as your motto: "Be there, before you are there" ... or to paraphrase ... act like you are as successful, as you envision yourself being.  Work the same hours as if solidly booked ... package yourself magnificently by dressing for success ... don't hang-out between clients, but use the time for career building (handing out business cards, marketing & self promoting, giving complimentary hair styles to potential "walking advertisements", doing color test strands, etc). So many hairdressers waste an amazing amount of time, doing nothing for their future.

Keep focused on your dream, and don't allow anybody else to distract you.  It is your future ... not theirs!!

russnyc
Posts: 1138
Platinum Member

Career
Posted: Monday, June 25, 2007 6:31:18 PM
All the posts above make a very good point, but I think the thing is that when you are a top performer and you always are there, it's easy for your boss to take advantage to the point that when you really do need time off or want to take a break they give you a really hard time about it, or try to keep you inside a cycle you don't really want to be in anymore. It's very important not just to achieve, but to keep the control of your career in your own hands and expectations, and know HOW to quell a boss like mare's when she is out of line.

Every seven years or so, it is a healthy thing to step back and look at where you're going. I've done this several times in my 21 year career. I took several years off and persued other aspects of my interests, then started over in a brand new city. What I have noticed time and time again is that highly structured environments and management only take you so far, and eventually you WILL OUTGROW every system. If YOU yourself don't take the time to recognize this, you will start to feel taken advantage of, resentful, or just plain burnt out.

Take the time to keep a business journal and a 1,3 and 5 year plan for yourself. Resolve issues peacefully yet be firm about what you want out of the relationships you have and your career. No one should dread going to work.

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Monday, June 25, 2007 6:57:30 PM

Valid points, russnyc ...

In my personal experience, my tenure in every salon (other than my own), has been 6 1/2 years ... go figure!  Interesting that russnyc said seven years.  Scary!!

Not that you should move every seven years ... but you will "out grow" to some extent, every situation.  I think it has to do with personal development.  Certainly, you should evaluate your situation, to determine if it is you, or the salon, that is the real problem.

At the same time ... along with what russnyc said ... it is true that an owner MAY take advantage of a high performer (even inadvertantly)  BUT ... the same high performer has a bigger club, than the other stylists, to use against the owner.

So use it, if that is the case ...   (gently, of course)



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

feeling taking advantage of
Posted: Thursday, June 28, 2007 4:35:50 PM

I am just curious - what bigger club are you talking about?  Most top performers do not hang out in any club.  They come to work, do their job, do not have time for the gossip, tend to help others when needed.  I have been in a situation where I was ruled to death in a form that stumpted my growth.  But I was not part of any club.  Wondering your thoughts on this.


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



coloru2
Posts: 504
Silver Member

Posted: Friday, June 29, 2007 12:07:56 AM
I think he meant club as in weapon, not club as in clique. Could be wrong though....

BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, June 29, 2007 12:16:28 AM

Oh ... how right you are color2u


As Teddy Roosevelt said ... "Speak softy, and carry a big stick!"



hues4you
Posts: 2566
Platinum Member

clubs
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2007 7:05:19 AM

Oh I get it - lol!  But even if the bigger club is the clientele that he could take with him, wouldn't the owner want to appreciate the high producer and work with them so they don't outgrow the salon enviroment?


Cindy Farr Hester  Asst Moderator



BRHair
Posts: 221
Bronze Member

Posted: Friday, June 29, 2007 11:26:14 PM
hues4you ... that is exactly the "club" towhich I'm referring.  No bigger position of strength ... a large clientelle, who will follow you!